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Interactive Map Showing Locations of Drownings at Low-Head Dams in the United States.

Interactive Map Showing Locations of Drownings at Low-Head Dams in the United States.

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Low-head dams can cause dangerous currents near the downstream face of the structure. Fatalities at low-head dams with such currents, often referred to as “drowning machines,” are poorly documented. This technical note presents a new database of fatalities at low-head dams in the United States together with an interactive map and web-based user int...

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... "Browse Incidents" page allows users to view the interactive map and a list of all locations in the U.S. where fatalities have occurred with their associ- ated incidents. The interactive map can be seen in Figure 4. The interactive map was built to allow indi- viduals to browse fatal sites by geographic location. ...

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... A fatality database can be used as a list of dams that almost certainly create submerged hydraulic jumps. Brigham Young University maintains a national low head dam fatality database with 625 fatalities recorded at 315 different dams [16]. It is certainly incomplete, but it is the largest public database available. ...
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