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Inter-period variation in the number of sites which rat are represented (source Rielly in prep. a), separating London from the rest of England.  

Inter-period variation in the number of sites which rat are represented (source Rielly in prep. a), separating London from the rest of England.  

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Evidence is shown for the history of the Black rat in Great Britain from its 1st century introduction up to the 14th century

Citations

Article
A large assemblage of small mammal and other small vertebrate bones was excavated within a relatively small area of a single room in a Roman villa close to the River Thames in South Oxfordshire. It is argued that these bones are the remains of barn owl pellets and that their presence shows that the roof on this room at least had remained intact for some time after either the entire building or this particular part of it had been abandoned as human habitation. The remains of several juvenile black rats were contained within the assemblage, making this the first record of black rats from a rural Romano-British setting in Oxfordshire and adding to the extremely small corpus of records of this species from a non-urban location anywhere in the country. Radiocarbon dates place the presence of rats and the abandonment of the villa during the second half of the fourth century.
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The book attempts to synthesis our current understanding of the spatial and temporal dynamics of plague, Yersinia pestis, and its environmental, political, economic, and social impacts from Ancient Greece to the modern day. This book also explores the identity of plague DNA, its human mortality, and the source of ancient and modern plagues. Welford also examines the role plague played in transfer of power from Mediterranean Europe to Northwestern Europe during the 500 years that plague raged across the continent until its European extinction in 1815. He also shows how recent colonial structures influenced the spread and mortality of plague while changing colonial histories. In addition, the Geographies of Plague provides critical insight into how plague has shaped modern medicine, public health, and disease monitoring, and what role, if any, plague might play as a terror weapon. The scope and breath of Geographies of Plague Pandemcis offers geographers, historians, biologists, and public health educators among many others the opportunity to explore the deep connections among disease and human existence.
Article
Zooarchaeological evidence is combined with anthropological, artistic and historical sources to investigate the role of human-animal interactions during periods of social change in post-Roman England. Data from nearly 500 assemblages covering 1500 years in southern England provide a unique basis to investigate the use of non-livestock animals in diverse areas from cosmology to commodities, companions to status. Results showcase the potential for integrated studies to provide insights into the changing perceptions of animals from creatures that play a role in the afterlife, to those that are earthbound and soulless, to express status and power, to reveal a demand for spectacle and education and to reflect contrasting functions of economy alongside an increasing sentimentality for pets.
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Biological invasions are one of the great threats to Earth’s ecosystems and biodiversity in the Anthropocene. However, species introductions and invasions extend deep into the human past, with the translocation of both wild and domestic species around the world. Here, we review the human translocation of wild plants and animals to the world’s islands. We focus on establishing criteria used to differentiate natural from human-assisted dispersals and the differences between non-native and invasive species. Our study demonstrates that, along with a suite of domesticates, ancient people transported numerous wild plants and animals to islands and helped shape ecosystems in ways that have important ramifications for modern conservation, restoration, and management.