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Inclusion of specific user groups in the design: Inclusive design of the train toilet. 

Inclusion of specific user groups in the design: Inclusive design of the train toilet. 

Source publication
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Train toilets are perceived to be dirty and as a consequence train travelers rate the toilet as insufficient. While the train toilet is mainly used to urinate it is for men impossible to keep the train toilet clean without spilling urine outside the bowl while standing. This causes women to hover while urinating and as a result they add to the soil...

Citations

... Understanding comfortable hygiene experiences in transportation systems is challenging, not only due to the privacy and safety issues but also due to the diverse demands of using public lavatories [7]. The co-creation sessions discovered that the activities around the basin, such as skin-caring, making-up, hair-styling, shaving, and washing face and hands are key to the comfortable hygiene experience during long-haul flights [6]. ...
Chapter
Full-text available
For designing large-scale products like an airplane, engaging end-users in the concept phase is difficult. However, early user evaluation is important to choose the path which fits the user’s needs best. In particular, comfort-related assessments are difficult to conduct with digital models that are shown on a desktop PC application. Digital Human Modelling (DHM) plays a role in postural comfort analysis, while the subjective comfort feedback still largely relied on consulting with end-users.
... Understanding comfortable hygiene experiences in transportation systems is challenging, not only due to the privacy and safety issues but also due to the diverse demands of using public lavatories [7]. The co-creation sessions discovered that the activities around the basin, such as skin-caring, making-up, hair-styling, shaving, and washing face and hands are key to the comfortable hygiene experience during long-haul flights [6]. ...
Preprint
Full-text available
For designing large-scale products like an airplane, engaging end-users in the concept phase is difficult. However, early user evaluation is important to choose the path which fits the user's needs best. In particular, comfort related assessments are difficult to conduct with digital models that are shown on a desktop PC application. Digital Human Modelling (DHM) plays a role in postural comfort analysis, while the subjective comfort feedback still largely relied on consulting with end-users. This paper applies a human-centered design process and analyses the advantages and disadvantages of using VR prototypes for involving users during concept design. This study focused on using VR prototypes for concept selection and verification based on comfort assessment with potential end-users. The design process started with an online questionnaire for identifying the quality of the design elements (Step 1 online study). Then, alternative concepts were implemented in VR, and users evaluated these concepts via a VR headset (Step 2 Selection study). Finally, the research team redesigned the final concept and assessed it with potential users via a VR headset (Step 3 Experience study). Every design element contributed positively to the long-haul flight comfort, especially tap-basin height, storage, and facilities. The male and female participants had different preferences on posture, lighting, storage, and facilities. The final prototype showed a significantly higher comfort rate than the original prototypes. The first-person immersion in VR headsets helps to identify the nuances between concepts, thus supports better decision-making via collecting richer and more reliable user feedback to make faster and more satisfying improvements.