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In the UK and Ireland, mussels (Mytilus edulis) and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) are the most commonly farmed marine species. Conventional cultivation and harvesting techniques are illustrated; (a) mussel dredge; (b) mussel raft; (c) salmon pens; (d) seaweed aquaculture (Saccharina latissima) provides potential for expansion of the UK and Ireland aquaculture industries. (Source of images: Ruth Callaway a, b, c; Michele Stanley d.)

In the UK and Ireland, mussels (Mytilus edulis) and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) are the most commonly farmed marine species. Conventional cultivation and harvesting techniques are illustrated; (a) mussel dredge; (b) mussel raft; (c) salmon pens; (d) seaweed aquaculture (Saccharina latissima) provides potential for expansion of the UK and Ireland aquaculture industries. (Source of images: Ruth Callaway a, b, c; Michele Stanley d.)

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Marine aquaculture relies on coastal habitats that will be affected by climate change. This review assesses current knowledge of the threats and opportunities of climate change for aquaculture in the UK and Ireland, focusing on the most commonly farmed species, blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) and Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). There is sparse eviden...

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... aquaculture in the UK and Ireland can be broadly divided into the shellfish and the finfish sectors ( Figure 1, Tables 1 and 2). Finfish aquaculture sites are clustered towards the north of the UK on the Western Scottish Highlands, Argyll, the Hebrides and Northern Isles. ...
Context 2
... a non-native species arrives in the UK or Ireland, its impact on the aquaculture industry could be extensive, either through the fouling of nets, cages, buoys, moorings, boat hulls and the cultured species themselves (Williams et al., 2010), or through their competition for resources. There are several examples of non-native tunicates already present in the UK and Ireland, which have had a significant economic impact in other countries on aquaculture industries through fouling: Didemnum vexillum (see Coutts and Forrest, 2007), Ciona intestinalis (see Ramsay et al., 2008), Styela clava (see Thompson and MacNair, 2004) and Botrylloides violaceus (see Bock et al., 2011). ...

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