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[In colour online.] Sonic Severn web platform (each image is a link to a sonification or sound composition). Site design copyright by the authors and participating students. 

[In colour online.] Sonic Severn web platform (each image is a link to a sonification or sound composition). Site design copyright by the authors and participating students. 

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This paper consists of a discussion of data sonification-a procedure in which information gathered from systems such as bodies or environmental processes is analyzed and reprocessed into audio models, so aspects of the process generating the data (for example, emotional or tidal ebb and flow) can be apprehended by human senses. This serves various...

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Citations

... As noted by Borch andcolleagues (2015, 1082-84) in their account of high-frequency trading, while rhythmanalysis provides a rich repertoire to empirically study bodily practices, it needs to be re-actualized to grasp how rhythms are translated into software algorithms. Such approaches include a recent thread of research which adapted rhythmanalysis to study the technological and algorithmic aspects of environmental processes (Palmer and Jones, 2014;Walker, 2014) and traffic management (Coletta and Kitchin 2017). ...
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