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In Manchester 1914 with two of his sons, Bodh Raj (centre) and Birbal (left). (Courtesy: Collection of Birbal Sahni at his Lucknow Residence)

In Manchester 1914 with two of his sons, Bodh Raj (centre) and Birbal (left). (Courtesy: Collection of Birbal Sahni at his Lucknow Residence)

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... wrote two papers (Sahni, 1915(Sahni, , 1917) communicated by Rutherford himself and whom he always regarded as a true guide and friend . During his stay at Manchester he was greatly helped by his son Birbal Sahni who was already in Cambridge completing his Tripos degrees ( Fig.1). In fact it is more than plausible that the topic of research Ruchi Ram had chosen to undertake at Manchester, namely the record of alpha, beta and gamma particles on photographic plates was influenced by his son's expertise in photography. ...
Context 2
... wrote two papers (Sahni, 1915(Sahni, , 1917) communicated by Rutherford himself and whom he always regarded as a true guide and friend . During his stay at Manchester he was greatly helped by his son Birbal Sahni who was already in Cambridge completing his Tripos degrees ( Fig.1). In fact it is more than plausible that the topic of research Ruchi Ram had chosen to undertake at Manchester, namely the record of alpha, beta and gamma particles on photographic plates was influenced by his son's expertise in photography. ...

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Citations

Article
Birbal Sahni (1891-1949) was well known as the first Indian palaeobotanist, and he established the Institute that was named after him, now the Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeosciences. Alexander L. du Toit (1878-1948) was the most famous South African geologist, known internationally for advocating the idea of Continental Drift, and for his work on Gondwana geology and palaeobotany. Du Toit was introduced to Sahni by Albert Seward, who was Sahni’s mentor at Cambridge University. They started a correspondence in 1925, involving the exchange of papers, books, and samples, which lasted at least until 1944. Du Toit and Sahni met in 1938 at the Indian Science Congress in Calcutta. Their preserved letters deal with the palaeobotany, correlations, and age of the Rajmahal beds, and later with the palynological investigations of Karoo Dwyka samples sent by du Toit to Sahni, which were worked on by D. D. Pant, who had been a student of Sahni. This correspondence reveals in detail just how these geoscientists involved with problems of Gondwana palaeogeography tackled these questions in spite of the long distances, and slow communications of the time. Information, especially that published in local journals, was disseminated by means of sending reprints, proof copies, and sometimes by handwritten lists of fossils. Although, initially, Sahni had obtained South African and Australian fossil material through the British Museum in London, he later obtained South African samples specially collected for him by du Toit. Samples were also exchanged between South Africa, England, India and Australia.