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Image macro meme featuring Richard Dawkins. Source. Anonymous.

Image macro meme featuring Richard Dawkins. Source. Anonymous.

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In 2015, a series of memes appeared on Twitter under the hashtag #HumanitarianStarWars. Combining still images from the original Star Wars movies with ironic references to humanitarian/development jargon and institutions, the memes presented a humorous reflection on the modern aid industry. While memetic content has become an increasingly scrutiniz...

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... such, Shifman (2013) points out that the concept of the meme has moved from academic into popular discourse, and then back again, as "new media" scholars attempt to conceptualize the nature and importance of this type of mass communicative culture and its social, political, and economic impacts. Figure 2 illustrates the journey of the concept, and its recursive, self-referential capacity. It also provides an example of one particular type of online meme: the "image macro" (Wiggins & Bowers, 2015). ...
Context 2
... necessity often accounts for the "DIY" character of meme creation or remixing. Here, the sloppy photoshopping of Dawkins's head in Figure 2 corresponds with Douglas's (2014) description of "Internet ugly" as a characteristic aesthetic style. Contributing to the reproduction of particular styles, the use of dedicated online tools allows users to quickly remix the words and images for participation in game-like meme conversations that take place on different online platforms. ...

Citations

... Context is defined as the set of antecedents, assumptions, and beliefs assumed to exist in the participant's mind. However, the ideological intention of meme creators may be ambiguous and memes can be understood or "decoded" (Hall, 2001) in multiple different ways by audiences (Chonka, 2019). ...
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Political polarization in Spain has been aggravated by a left-wing coalition government and the rise of the extreme right in the context of health and economic crisis created by COVID-19. This article delves into the collective story that memes offer of this context and aims to establish a categorization that can be used for comparison with other countries. We carried out a content analysis of 636 Spanish political memes published on Twitter throughout 2020. Current affairs were taken into account, as well as the frame, and rhetorical elements, references to popular culture, and symbols. We also took into consideration the objectives of the message and the presence of offensive content. We demonstrate that these memes do not play a subversive role, but rather contribute to the polarization and fragmentation of the digital public, echoing the existing ideological confrontation. They do not deliver new ideas, but only reproduce expressions and disqualifications already existing in the society, although the disinhibition of anonymity magnifies the intensity. Current affairs are an excuse to convey ideological position, and political communication becomes more emotional. There are no significant differences in terms of political polarization between left and right, and criticism toward politicians is mainly of personal and moral nature. Hate speech on other social media appears in these cultural creations, highlighting the misogyny toward women politicians regardless of their political party. The rhetorical and expressive resources are adapted to this confrontation, and there is little innovation because it is subject to the understanding of the message.