Fig 4 - uploaded by Cathy Fitzgerald
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Image from a video in which Simon Read describes his practice.

Image from a video in which Simon Read describes his practice.

Source publication
Thesis
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Eco-social art practitioners routinely foster cycles of multi-constituent translation, reflection and action, across lifeworlds, art, science, and other socio-political domains to progress new life-sustaining knowledge. This enquiry, however, reveals the absence of a guiding theory and a clearly articulated methodology for such transversal practice...

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... social media's promise for independent activity has decreased as it has become more commercialised (Chapter 3.3). Nevertheless, in the light at dusk (see The Hollywood Forest Story eBook, pp. 67, 76) ( Fig. 44), a film of young ash trees growing in the dark (ibid.. p. Ecocide to make Sustainability Legal' (Fig. 45 below). Motivated by the absence of legal measures to protect forests against clear-felling in ...
Context 2
... social media's promise for independent activity has decreased as it has become more commercialised (Chapter 3.3). Nevertheless, in the light at dusk (see The Hollywood Forest Story eBook, pp. 67, 76) ( Fig. 44), a film of young ash trees growing in the dark (ibid.. p. Ecocide to make Sustainability Legal' (Fig. 45 below). Motivated by the absence of legal measures to protect forests against clear-felling in ...
Context 3
... audiences was not examined. While the Green House Britain exhibition offered significant and imaginative ways for presenting climate change issues, this suggests that it would have engaged more, including younger and non-art audiences, had it developed an ongoing, online presence from the start, in addition to the toured installation exhibition (Fig. 46 below). As mentioned, the Harrisons have long realised that the story and interpretive potential of their 'conversational drift' (the value of collaborative conversations they direct) is the critical outcome for their many projects. More recently it appears that the Harrisons began to apply a social media strategy to their ongoing 50-year ...
Context 4
... of such diverse outcomes when each viewing spectator of Duchamp's work will develop a personal refrain, 'a different temporal rhythm, which singularises and individuates its Other 'lines of flight' develop when some in my community copy some of my practices, such as neighbours and blog followers, who have been inspired to engage in ecoforestry (Fig. 54), to which they add their subjective desires and conditions. important when one realises the fashion industry is a cause but also a potential leader for sustainable materials and ...
Context 5
... Dean Moore and others highlight this point in different ways. Rifkin (2014) Standing in a small forest in rural Ireland, ten years after this small conifer plantation transformation began, I listen to the increasing diversity and intensity of the dawn chorus that results from 'Close-to- Nature' forestry. Reversing Rachel Carson's 'Silent Spring' (Fig. 64) is a slow art-a delicate dance with others, that is ultimately concerned with human-nonhuman communities thriving. I reflect that the eco-social art practice framework clearly articulates this ambition in The Hollywood Forest Story: revealing its ongoing aim, method, activities and social power, to re-think forestry practices in ...

Citations

... Cathy Fitzgerald has since 2008 been working on The Hollywood Forest Story, located in Co Carlow, Eire. She has used the ecosophy of Guattari to provide a theoretical frame for what she describes as her eco-social art practice (Fitzgerald, 2018). On the ground she has been working with communities, experts and with the small monocultural conifer plantation where she lives to co-create a flourishing and permanent, mixed-species forest. ...
Article
Full-text available
Educational theorist Gert Biesta proposes that we need to be “in the world without occupying the centre of the world.” (Biesta, 2017, p. 3). This injunction provides a frame with which to interrogate the hybrid practice of ecoart. This practice can be characterised by a concern for the relations of living things to each other, and to their environments. Learning in order to be able to act is critical. One aspect is collaboration with experts (whether those are scientists and environmental managers or inhabitants, including more-than-human). Another is building ‘commons’ and shared understanding being more important than novelty. Grant Kester has argued that there is an underlying paradigm shift in ‘aesthetic autonomy’, underpinned by a ‘trans-disciplinary interest in collective knowledge production’. (2013, np). This goes beyond questions of interdisciplinarity and its variations to raise more fundamental questions of agency. Drawing on the work of key practitioner/researchers (Jackie Brookner (1945-2015); Collins and Goto Studio, Helen Mayer Harrison (1927-2018) and Newton Harrison (b 1932)) and theorists (Bishop, Kester, Kagan) the meaning and implications of not ‘occupying the centre of the world’ will be explored as a motif for an art which can act in public space.