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Hype cycle with digital twin at the top of the peak of expectations, August 2018 (Gartner, 2018).

Hype cycle with digital twin at the top of the peak of expectations, August 2018 (Gartner, 2018).

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Conference Paper
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Digital twins have received a large amount of exposure stating the value they can offer industry, generating lots of noise, however demonstrations that present industrial use cases are uncommon. Prototypes of the current state of the art are needed however for industry to be able to develop business cases to generate investment into the technology...

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... the other hand, few digital twin examples are publicly available for discussion to understand the benefits with even fewer utilising immersive technologies. This may be due to the current hype cycle of where the technology stands at the time of writing, as shown in Figure 1. Digital twin is almost at the peak of inflate expectations where we are seeing some early adopters producing success stories, while others may be failing or not starting to invest at all. ...

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