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Hydrodynamic data. (a) Added mass m r (ω), (b) Radiation damping B r (ω), (c) Magnitude |H e (ω)| and (d) phase ∠H e (ω) of the excitation force frequency response.

Hydrodynamic data. (a) Added mass m r (ω), (b) Radiation damping B r (ω), (c) Magnitude |H e (ω)| and (d) phase ∠H e (ω) of the excitation force frequency response.

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Conference Paper
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Passive loading is a suboptimal method of control for wave energy converters (WECs) that usually consists of tuning the power take-o� (PTO) damping of the WEC to either the energy or the peak frequency of the local wave spectrum. Such approach results in a good solution for waves characterized by one-peak narrowband spectra. Nonetheless, real ocean...

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... hydrodynamic coefficients of the cylinder were computed using the boundary element solver WAMIT, Inc. (1998- 2006). Figure 3 illustrates the added mass and radiation damping coefficients, and the frequency response of the excitation force. Radiation damping B r (ω), (c) Magnitude |H e (ω)| and (d) phase ∠H e (ω) of the excitation force frequency response. ...

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