Table 2 - uploaded by Rodrigo Gómez García
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Households owning equipment, 2005-2009 

Households owning equipment, 2005-2009 

Context in source publication

Context 1
... households are not prepared to access content provided by digital media. According to INEGI, of 23.9 million TV households, only 3.6 million own a digital device (see Table 2). Socio-economic indicators suggest that the technological readiness of households will not increase in the coming years unless the government subsidizes digital equipment, such as set-top boxes. ...

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... Some of the old practices that the government employed for controlling the press disappeared. However, other practices remain in a new hybrid system in which newspapers still receive large amounts of money from federal, state, and municipal governments without proper accountability (Ahmed, 2017;Fundar, 2017;Gómez & Sosa-Plata, 2011). Typically, the flow of public funding from the Mexican government to newspapers has not been transparent and lacks clear rules of operation, which has opened the door to corruption and collusion. ...
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