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Hours of homework per week-PISA 2012. Source: (OECD, 2014))

Hours of homework per week-PISA 2012. Source: (OECD, 2014))

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Conference Paper
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Recent reports based on PISA data have shown a generally positive relationship between the amount of time spent on homework and achievement, and a negative relationship between a measure of socioeconomic status and homework time for secondary students. These findings suggest that homework practices are either reflecting or contributing to achieveme...

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... to the most recently available PISA data, in 2012 Australian 15 year-old students report undertaking around six hours of homework per week-an hour more than the OECD average ( Figure 1). It is important to note that this amount of homework time is similar to the amount of time recommended for this age group (as reflected by modal year level) by the Victorian Department of Education and Training (2014). ...

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Citations

... We extend this line of research to consider how educators account for another status-reinforcing practice: homework-and specifically, math homework. Research has highlighted inequalities in students' homework production (Bowd et al., 2016;Daw, 2012;Kohn, 2006) and linked those inequalities to differences in students' home lives (Xu, 2010) and in the support students' families can provide (Byun & Park, 2012;Calarco, 2020;Domina, 2005;Else-Quest et al., 2008;Haley-Lock & Posey-Maddox, 2016;Lanuza, 2017;Ramirez, 2003;Silinskas & Kikas, 2019). Less clear, however, is how educators account for homework inequalities and how those accounts shape their practice. ...
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Homework has been associated with a range of academic and cognitive benefits for secondary students. Research has also revealed that students’ homework behaviours can vary with demographic traits. An important factor that may account for some of this variation is the role played by teachers and schools in homework allocation. It is hypothesised that some of the demographic variables that have been found to predict individual students’ homework practices are also related to teachers’ practices in terms of the frequency and volume of homework allocated at the classroom level. To test this hypothesis, Australian data from the 2015 Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study are analysed in the current study. Results show that the frequency of mathematics homework allocated by teachers is related to some variables that have commonly predicted the differences in student achievement such as socioeconomic status, valuing of and confidence in mathematics, teaching experience and school location. The implications of these findings for schools and education systems are explored as suggestions for ensuring that homework policies and practices do not exacerbate demographic differences in school outcomes.