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Horizontal distributions of total silicoflagellates, the ebridian Ebria tripartita, and the endoskeletal dinoflagellate Actiniscus pentasterias in the sea surface waters (0 and ~4.5-m depth) during cruise MR10-05 in September–October 2010. a Total abundance of silicoflagellate skeletons (number of skeletons l⁻¹); b relative abundance (%) of D. medianoctisol and D. octonarius among total silicoflagellates (stations with fewer than 10 silicoflagellates were omitted from this plot); c abundance of ebridian skeletons (number of skeletons l⁻¹); d abundance of Actiniscus pentasterias skeletons (number of skeletons l⁻¹)

Horizontal distributions of total silicoflagellates, the ebridian Ebria tripartita, and the endoskeletal dinoflagellate Actiniscus pentasterias in the sea surface waters (0 and ~4.5-m depth) during cruise MR10-05 in September–October 2010. a Total abundance of silicoflagellate skeletons (number of skeletons l⁻¹); b relative abundance (%) of D. medianoctisol and D. octonarius among total silicoflagellates (stations with fewer than 10 silicoflagellates were omitted from this plot); c abundance of ebridian skeletons (number of skeletons l⁻¹); d abundance of Actiniscus pentasterias skeletons (number of skeletons l⁻¹)

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Spatial and temporal variations in major phytoplankton populations such as diatoms in the changing Arctic Ocean have been well studied, whereas only a few monitoring studies have been conducted on minor siliceous flagellates. To discern the relationship between hydrographic conditions and the spatio-temporal distribution of silicoflagellates, ebrid...

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