Figure 3 - uploaded by Isa Dussauge
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Homer Simpson's brain seen with MRI/X ray. Image reproduced on many Internet sites.

Homer Simpson's brain seen with MRI/X ray. Image reproduced on many Internet sites.

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... and Ståhlberg therefore developed their own "rotating phantom", enabling a simultaneous testing of a whole range of linear velocities. 79 Figure 30 shows the design of the phantom itself: It was based on a rotating wheel mounted between two static parts. The wheel was filled with a special gel in which flow was induced when the wheel was turning. ...
Context 2
... wheel was filled with a special gel in which flow was induced when the wheel was turning. The third picture on Figure 30 shows that the flow induced in a vertical section at the level of the center of the wheel was predictable and was in a mathematically simple relation to the distance to the center of the wheel. In order to test the MRI sequences for flow measurement, the researchers produced an MR image of that vertical section, which is shown on Figure 31 (left). ...
Context 3
... third picture on Figure 30 shows that the flow induced in a vertical section at the level of the center of the wheel was predictable and was in a mathematically simple relation to the distance to the center of the wheel. In order to test the MRI sequences for flow measurement, the researchers produced an MR image of that vertical section, which is shown on Figure 31 (left). The picture on the right on Figure 31 illustrates that the researchers plotted the measured MRI-signal characteristic ("phase") against the theoretically calculated velocities for a set of points in the imaged vertical section. ...
Context 4
... order to test the MRI sequences for flow measurement, the researchers produced an MR image of that vertical section, which is shown on Figure 31 (left). The picture on the right on Figure 31 illustrates that the researchers plotted the measured MRI-signal characteristic ("phase") against the theoretically calculated velocities for a set of points in the imaged vertical section. Hence they established a linear correspondence between quantitative MRI information (phase) and velocity; this relation matched theoretical results and enabled the researchers to translate the MRI-characteristic phase into velocity in further measurements, e.g. ...
Context 5
... MR image of the phantom displayed in Figure 31 informs the reading of the MR images of CSF flow in vivo reproduced in Figure 32. Figure 32 shows a series of MR pictures of the CSF flow produced after calibration on the phantom. The main part of the pictures is displayed in a gray scale; it looks mostly similar throughout the images and stands for the cross- sectional anatomy of the surroundings of the cerebral aqueduct. ...

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... They can also signify a reproduction of traditional medical hierarchies between doctors (radiologists) and allied health professionals (radiographers) (Joyce 2006). Existing studies have examined the ways in which results from MRI scans inform clinical decision-making in a range of areas particularly those relating to the brain such as neuroscience and psychiatry (Dussauge 2008, Rapp 2011. However, much existing sociological work on MRI has been concentrated on its position in the subspecialty of radiology. ...
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