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Hierarchical control structure. Manipulated variable depends on the PTO: Bypass valves, swashplate angle, excitation current or conduction angle. Optimal force/velocity calculated as setpoint for the feedforward control.

Hierarchical control structure. Manipulated variable depends on the PTO: Bypass valves, swashplate angle, excitation current or conduction angle. Optimal force/velocity calculated as setpoint for the feedforward control.

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Wave energy's path towards commercialization requires maximizing reliability, survivability, an improvement in energy harvested from the wave and efficiency of the wave to wire conversion. In this sense, control strategies directly impact the survivability and safe operation of the device, as well as the ability to harness the energy from the wave....

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Context 1
... control problem for the wave energy sector does not fit the classic description of control for other industries where control strategies involve the use of feedback (open loop, closed loop and set-point tracking) and forcing the system variables to a constant value. Instead, WEC control aims for maximization of captured energy while relying on feedforward control to generate optimal device velocity or PTO force setpoints (Figure 7). ...
Context 2
... control problem for the wave energy sector does not fit the classic description of control for other industries where control strategies involve the use of feedback (open loop, closed loop and setpoint tracking) and forcing the system variables to a constant value. Instead, WEC control aims for maximization of captured energy while relying on feedforward control to generate optimal device velocity or PTO force setpoints (Figure 7). where í µí±£(í µí±¡) is the device velocity, and í µí±“ (í µí±¡) is the exerted PTO force. ...

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