Figure 1 - available via license: CC BY
Content may be subject to copyright.
Heart rate variability interpretation. Abbreviations: BPM, Beats per Minute; HR, Heart Rate; HRV, Heart Rate Variability.

Heart rate variability interpretation. Abbreviations: BPM, Beats per Minute; HR, Heart Rate; HRV, Heart Rate Variability.

Source publication
Article
Full-text available
Physical activity impacts positively on stress and anxiety. Working conditions affect the quality of life by increasing stress levels, which can affect job performance and work absence. The Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), Work Ability Index (WAI), Transtheoretical Model (TTM), as well as heart rate variability (HRV) have been applied to monitor the s...

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... when the organism is relaxed HR is decreased by our parasympathetic nervous system and the time between successive RR-intervals gets longer thus HRV increases. This fluctuation in time between RR-intervals is called the HRV (Figure 1). Finally, we obtained: a total stress time in 24 h; stress percentage (%Stress), which is the percentage of reaction to stress in an average of 24 h; recovery time in 24 h, which includes the time in which the body is recovering; and the recovery percentage in 24 h (%Recovery). ...
Context 2
... results show the TTM as a consistent and discriminatory questionnaire that represents physiological stress with regard to the other questionnaires. Accordingly, the Stage 5 group has better values than the other groups (Stages 1,2,3-4) in the variables %Stress, %Recovery, and RMSSD. Moreover, the relation between both WAI and physiological stress, and PSS and physiological stress results were analyzed. ...

Citations

... Thus, high HRV levels are a marker of less stress. Accordingly, HRV represents the ability of the heart to respond to different contextual stimuli [14,15]. Nonetheless, occupational stimuli such as high levels of noise or vibrations might alter the sympathetic and parasympathetic responses in airport staff or students [16,17]. ...
... The HRV measurements were recorded using the Firstbeat Bodyguard 2 device (Firstbeat Technologies Ltd., Jyväskylä, Finland), a non-invasive device developed by Firstbeat Technologies Ltd. This instrument has been used in previous studies [1,14] and has shown acceptable validity and reliability for the variables included in this study [30]. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background: This study aimed (1) to analyse the effect of non-occupational physical activity (NOPA) on the stress levels of fitness professionals, and (2) to apply a questionnaire to workers measuring burnout syndrome, working conditions and job satisfaction, and to compare the results with physiological stress and recovery measured objectively through heart rate variability (HRV). Methods: The HRV of 26 fitness instructors was recorded during 2-5 workdays using Firstbeat Bodyguard 2. Participants also completed a questionnaire (CESQT) measuring working conditions and job satisfaction variables and occupational burnout syndrome. Results: NOPA showed a negative association with both the percentage of stress (p < 0.05) and stress-recovery ratio (p < 0.01), and a positive association with the percentage of recovery (p < 0.05). Better work conditions (working hours, salary satisfaction and length of service) were associated with lower stress in fitness professionals. Conclusion: NOPA appears to improve the stress levels of fitness instructors in this study cohort. Self-reported burnout levels measured through the CESQT questionnaire do not coincide with the physiological stress responses measured through HRV. Better working conditions appear to reduce the stress response in fitness professionals.
... Psychosocial aspects of work, such as shift work, conflicting demands, or time pressure have been observed to increase the risk of musculoskeletal pain (Igic et al., 2013). Repeated or enduring strain is related to musculoskeletal pain through a variety of psychological, for example, pain-related fear or individual coping styles (Boselie & Vlaeyen, 2017;Jun et al., 2019), and physiological processes, for example, decrease of heart-rate variability or increase in blood pressure (Marin-Farrona et al., 2020;Munakata, 2018), that elicit muscle tension (Minerbi & Vulfsons, 2018;Nawab et al., 2010). Observational studies, including taxi-drivers (Burgel & Elshatarat, 2017) and nurses , have shown that work stressors are associated with musculoskeletal pain. ...
Article
Background Auxiliary tasks such as administrative work often include tasks that are unnecessary in the view of workers but still have to be done. These tasks can threaten a worker’s self-esteem. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of unnecessary and unreasonable tasks on musculoskeletal pain. Methods Fifty-five office workers (29 male; mean age = 41.96, SD = 14.2 years) reported their unnecessary and unreasonable tasks at the beginning of the study and kept a diary of their daily musculoskeletal pain over 5 weeks, using a visual analogue scale. Other work-related risk factors (prolonged sitting), job resources (participation in decision-making), and individual risk factors (sex, smoking, exercise, body mass index, maladaptive back beliefs) were controlled for in multilevel regression analysis. Findings Multilevel regression analysis with 742 reports showed unnecessary tasks ( B = 4.27, p = .006)—but not unreasonable tasks ( B = 3.05, p = .074)—to predict the daily intensity of musculoskeletal pain, beyond other significant risk factors, such as prolonged sitting ( B = 2.06, p = .039), body mass index ( B = 1.52, p < .001), and maladaptive back beliefs ( B = 3.78, p = .003). Participation in decision-making was not a significant protective factor ( B = −1.67, p = .176). Conclusions/Application to Practice The higher frequency of unnecessary tasks—compared with unreasonable tasks—could place workers at risk for musculoskeletal pain. Work redesign that reduces unnecessary and unreasonable tasks can make a valuable contribution to worker health and safety among office workers.
... Subjective tools such as questionnaires are used to measure stress levels in workers. In the last 2 decades questionnaires like the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) have received much attention by researchers; it emerges that the perception of work-related stress -as measured by this scale in terms of unpredictability, lack of control and overload-has a significant impact on worker's quality of life; notwithstanding its characteristic to refer only to the last month, considering that stress is a continually changing state (22,23). ...
Article
Full-text available
Stressful life events, are differently handled by women and men. This study evaluates gender differences in perceived stress and health status among a sample of subjects going through a transition period from unemployment to work. This cross-sectional study enrolled 395 participants, 245 men (62%) and 150 (38%) women, between 19 and 67 years, that were going to be hired for a 6-month contract. Before being employed, all participants underwent a mandatory protocol consisting in a general medical check. Stress assessment was performed by using the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). Most of the participants (68%) showed normal to low perceived stress level. But dividing the sample by gender, out of the remaining 32% with medium to high stress level, 11% male subjects and 22.7% females reported high perceived stress values. We found mean PSS values that are overlapping with those in the general population of developed countries. This study does not suggest an association between perceived stress and health or social parameters. However, our results highlight that the female gender is associated with higher stress level, pointing out the relevance of specific and designed interventions in the context of health promotion programs, especially in order to mitigate stress in more susceptible subjects.