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Haplotype information for the network of Artemia based on COI loci

Haplotype information for the network of Artemia based on COI loci

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Article
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Artemia franciscana, native to America, has recently colonized as non-indigenous population in Asia, Europe, North Africa, and Australia. We evaluated the effects of the colonization of A. franciscana on genetic differentiation in new environments in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). We used the COI marker to determine the genetic structure and origi...

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... H10, and H12 are the major types, and are 57.06% (97 ind.), 18.24% (31 ind.), and 12.94% (22 ind.) of the whole tested samples, respectively (as shown in Ta- ble 3). In addition, the majority of the sequences belong to H1, including 47.42% AWWR, 46.39% GL, 4.12% SFB, and 2.07% GSL sequences, respectively ( Fig.3 and Table 4). ...
Context 2
... H10, and H12 are the major types, and are 57.06% (97 ind.), 18.24% (31 ind.), and 12.94% (22 ind.) of the whole tested samples, respectively (as shown in Ta- ble 3). In addition, the majority of the sequences belong to H1, including 47.42% AWWR, 46.39% GL, 4.12% SFB, and 2.07% GSL sequences, respectively ( Fig.3 and Table 4). ...

Citations

Preprint
Full-text available
Due to the lack of a taxonomic key for the identification of Artemia species, molecular markers have been increasingly used for phylogenetic studies. The mtCOI marker is a regularly considered marker for the molecular systematics of Artemia populations. The proposed universal and specific primers have mostly failed to amplify the Artemia aff. sinica mtCOI marker, and on the whole, the successfully amplified products of the PCR were inefficient, primarily through the representation of poly-peak or incomplete sequences. We presumed that if a forward primer could be developed regarding the joint regions of the last part of the previous gene (tRNATyr) and the beginning of the target gene mtCOI, the sequence could be relevant to the target-sequence of mtCOI. Thus, here, we describe a new set of primers, which could be used to amplify the mtCOI barcoding region of Artemia aff. sinica Cai, 1989, with a high performance of sequencing. The new primer set worked well also for other Artemia bisexual species, as well as for parthenogenetic populations. It is recommended that joint regions between the previous/next gene(s) and the target marker, could be aimed at when designing specific primers for other markers and taxa.