Figure 1 - uploaded by Nicolai Marquardt
Content may be subject to copyright.
Hall's proxemic zones.

Hall's proxemic zones.

Source publication
Article
Full-text available
Proxemic Interactions envision interactive computer systems that exploit peoples ’ and devices ’ spatial relationships (proxemics) to provide more natural and seamless interactions with ubicomp technology. It builds upon fundamental proxemic theories about people’s understanding and use of the personal space around them. In this paper, we focus on...

Context in source publication

Context 1
... particular, he correlates physical distance to social distance between people. As illustrated in Figure 1, he categorizes this into four discrete distance zones, ranging from: intimate (0250cm), personal (0.521m), social (124m), and public (>4m). These collective distances, which Hall calls the dynamic space, characterize a progression of interactions ranging from highly intimate, to personal, to social and then to public [1]. ...

Similar publications

Conference Paper
Full-text available
As web usage grows and diversifies, design of interfaces for all becomes a big challenge. This work proposes an approach that enables to involve an unlimited number of users in the design process in a playful way. It benefits from resources offered by the Web as well as from the interest of people for playing games in the Internet. The central idea...

Citations

... Il existe donc plusieurs façons de lancer un rayon à partir de la surface de la vitrine (cf. (Marquardt & Greenberg, 2012), afin que les passants interagissent avec la vitrine avec un minimum d'instructions. ...
Thesis
Durant cette dernière décennie, la quantité de données numériques n'a cessé d'augmenter. Ces données provenant de l'Internet des Objets ou de smartphones permettent aux utilisateurs de comprendre et d'analyser leur santé, leur mode de vie ou encore leur consommation énergétique, et aux différentes institutions (villes, campus, promoteurs immobiliers) de gérer le flux de population, le trafic routier ou les pertes énergétiques dans les bâtiments administrés. Le domaine de la "ville intelligente" en tire particulièrement profit. Il est donc capital de mettre à disposition des visualisations interactives de ces données pour pouvoir faire émerger des connaissances et faciliter la prise de décision. Une approche récente propose de représenter ces données proches de l'objet qui les capte ou les produit. Cependant, ce domaine est encore assez récent et il reste de nombreux défis à explorer. Un des défis majeurs identifié par Thomas et collab. (Thomas et al., 2018) est le développement et la conception de techniques d'interaction pour faciliter l'analyse de données situées. L'objectif de nos travaux de thèse est de concevoir et d'évaluer des solutions interactives tirant profit du référent physique pour interagir avec des données numériques situées en se focalisant sur une tâche interactive fondamentale en IHM : la sélection. Dans ce manuscrit nous abordons cette tâche selon une approche fonctionnelle et une approche conceptuelle.
... The question raised for public space and private space is on how the law views the two spaces, because different space will have different legal consequences. Edward T. Hall presented proxemics as a hypothesis for contemplating the relational spatial connections between people [6]. His hypothesis, by and large, portrays how individuals see, decipher, and (regularly unwittingly) utilize the micro space around them, and how this influences their association and correspondence with another close by individuals; however, he likewise referred to that culture and starting point of the nation will contrast starting with one then onto the next. ...
... The goal of systematic literature review is to seek an article to review, read by candidate study in order to follow systematic literature theory [7]. From this systematic literature review it is found factors in digital proxemics are: distance, orientation, movement, identity, location [6]; pseudonym as private sphere [8]; spatial; role; fidelity; control [9]; proxemic interaction [10]; sound as stimulation to proxemics behavior [11]; role of familiarity for feedback [12]; distance, pose, orientation [13]; location, distance, motion, orientation, custom [14]; gaze, proxemic imaging [15]; orientation, distance, motion, identity, location, proximity toolkit [16]; proxemic transition, transition speed, stepwise reconfiguration, radical shifts [17]; control proxemics, deixis proxemics, perceptual proxemics [18]; disclosure boundary, identity boundary, temporal boundary [19], avatar gaze, avatar facial expression, avatar body posture, avatar gesture, avatar space [20]; rule [21]; reinforcement learning [22]; mood [23]; facial, vocal emotion, internal noise level, physical appearance [24]; density stress [25]; child proxemics depend on peer and parents [26]; ethnic appearance [27]; face distance [28]; group behavior [29]; level of attention, content speed, user shadow contrast, scale [30]; display space, interaction space, potential interaction space, gap space, social interaction space, comfort space, activation space [31]. ...
... Therefore, content movement represents person movement in digital proxemics. Content movement is a motion consisting of change of orientation and distance that travels through cyber space over time [6]. There are two variables related in content movement that can be associated with digital proxemics [16]: ...
Article
Full-text available
The evolution of cybercrime has various types and dimensions, and sometimes it is complicated to be resolved by law enforcement agency in Indonesia. On the other hand, the public oftentimes is surprised to get their position as a victim in doing something that is common in cyber space. Discrepancy between public perspective and law perspective created tension between the public and law enforcement. Gap of understanding within cyber space concept is because sometimes the law is difficult to catch the dynamic phenomenon in cyber space that shifts in very fast way with many convergence concepts. By the convergency principle in cyber space, this paper tries to discuss from the science of communication. In digital media, communication role is very important, because in cyber space of the backbone concept is communication, and one of the concepts of digital communication is digital proxemics that will be explored with literature review method. This paper found that proxemics concept can determine the scope of personal data protection from privacy and the distribution of information.
... More recently, we have witnessed a certain resurgence in Hall's influence in the context of technology innovation. This has been driven as a more sophisticated computational ability to sense and interpret our environment allowing technologies to be more sentient of what is around and to establish proximal relations between ourselves, people and objects, e.g., [52,74,144,146,148,187,213,243]. In particular Greenberg et al.'s [74] exposition of proxemic interactions has done much to influence this recent thinking around proxemics in HCI and ubiquitous computing research. ...
Thesis
Full-text available
Three people meet to work on a slide deck together. They all place their mobile devices on a table, and one of them slams the table surface with the fist. The devices jointly sense the impact and connect to each other. Now, the three users are ready to collaborate on the slides across their devices. This is just one of several prototype concepts that Jens Emil developed during his PhD. Engaging in co-located collaboration, people often transition between individual and shared work, organizing themselves flexibly around computing devices and furniture. However, current technologies lack support for such transitions. Addressing this issue, Jens Emil’s research shows how interactive technologies can be designed to support more flexibility – both in how we share digital content and how we transition between different ways of working together in physical spaces. The research contributions build on proxemics – the study of how humans interact with each other in shared physical space. Jens Emil experimented with two new “paradigms”: (1) cross-device interaction, enabling flexible connectivity as well as spatial distribution of digital content and control; and (2) shape-changing tabletops, enabling transitions in users’ physical organization and collaboration around shared digital content. Jens Emil’s research contributes to the understanding of how novel interactive technologies can be designed to support more flexibility in co-located digital sharing and physical organization of collaborative activities. This PhD project was conducted in the Ubiquitous Computing and Interaction Group, Department of Computer Science, Science and Technology, Aarhus University, with support from Microsoft Research, Cambridge, UK.
... In case of interactions involving humans, research on the proxemic interactions between humans [264,265] shows that humans subconsciously define four areas in which we project our presence with differing intensity. As this thesis has its roots in the domain of device ecosystems -where it is assumed that mobile devices are owned and carried by humans -the concept of proxemics is merged with the Focus-Nimbus model to create what is called a "Proxemic Territorial Nimbus" (PTN): a territory made up of up to four proxemic zones of interaction that a wearable device defines for itself. ...
Thesis
Full-text available
This thesis proposes the cognitive ensemble reference architecture. Cognitive Systems attempt to map human thought processes onto technical information systems. Achieving this for coordinated device ensembles is hereby considered a particular challenge. Based on a specification of (software) components and a coordination metaphor utilizing live, semantic annotations, this reference architecture represents a template for the implementation of cognitive behaviors in ensembles comprised of heterogeneous, networked computing devices. Previous efforts to bring together and take forward these fields of research have either been too specific in their implementation thereby failing to achieve wider application, or been hindered by user acceptance, lack of interoperability, and complexity of participation. This thesis establishes a very basic definition of what cognitive ensembles are and how they may be created, based firmly on accepted knowledge from the fields of artificial intelligence and cognitive psychology. Multiple exemplary ensemble instantiations are described, used for investigation of research questions and evaluated according to the outlined aspects and properties of the cognitive ensemble reference architecture. This thesis constitutes a contribution to artificial intelligence research and cognitive psychology, specifically in the domain of cognitive systems, live tuple spaces, wide-scale adoption of IoT-style systems, multi-agent coordination and design of reference architectures.
... Mechanisms to understand the distancing behavior of people with robots based on speech and gaze have already been proposed (Mumm & Mutlu, 2011). A great number of studies have been carried out based on static models of users and contexts of interaction to decide the appropriate proxemics (Dragone, Saunders, & Dautenhahn, 2015;Marquardt & Greenberg, 2012). Many studies have been conducted to identify the user activities and behavior as well (Gaglio, Re, & Morana, 2015;Kanda et al., 2009;Sirithunge, Jayasekara, & Pathirana, 2017;Vitiello, Acampora, Staffa, Siciliano, & Rossi, 2017;Wu, Pan, Xiong, & Xu, 2014). ...
Chapter
Human-like decision-making skills are sought after during the design of social robots. On the one hand, such features enable a robot to be easily handled by its non-expert user. On the other hand, the robot will have the capability of dealing with humans in such a way that the human will not be disturbed by the behavior of the robot. In an effort to introduce proxemics-based etiquettes to a social robot, we have used a teleoperated robot to find human interest in the intelligent proxemic and conversational behavior of a robot. Engagement of humans with a situation-cautious behavior of the robot upon a static approach behavior was examined during the study. During this approach, physiological cues displayed by the humans were used by the robot to perceive an encounter with humans. As the robot approached the subject after analyzing the physiological behavior of the subject, spatial constraints occur due to the movement of the robot could be demolished. Furthermore, utterances generated by the robot to initiate an interaction with the user were decided by predicting the intentions of that individual based on these displayed human cues. Results of the experiment confirm the fact that a more socially acceptable spatial and verbal behavior could be observed from the robot through situation-awareness than a static behavior.
... Mechanisms to understand the distancing behavior of people with robots based on speech and gaze have already been proposed (Mumm & Mutlu, 2011). A great number of studies have been carried out based on static models of users and contexts of interaction to decide the appropriate proxemics (Dragone, Saunders, & Dautenhahn, 2015;Marquardt & Greenberg, 2012). Many studies have been conducted to identify the user activities and behavior as well (Gaglio, Re, & Morana, 2015;Sirithunge, Jayasekara, & Pathirana, 2017;Vitiello, Acampora, Staffa, Siciliano, & Rossi, 2017;Wu, Pan, Xiong, & Xu, 2014). ...
Chapter
Human–robot interaction is a well-studied research field today; robots vary from tele-operators and avatars to robots with social characteristics. In this review paper, first we present related work on tele-operation, mobile robotic telepresence, and social robots. Then, we focus on the role of gestures and body language in robotics, and more precisely their importance for communication in collaborative settings. In our collaborative setting scenario, we have a group of multiple human users working on collaborative problem-solving around a tangible user interface (TUI). A TUI employs physical artifacts both as “representations” and “controls” for computational media. We have the same situation in a separate spatial location. We extend this specific scenario by having an avatar robot in each one of the two locations which represents remote team members and mirrors their actions, gaze, and gestures. Our goal in this paper is to give an overview of current solutions that provide a sense of being in a different place and to describe our future scenario of having an avatar robot solving a problem on a TUI collaboratively with human users. We present a discussion about technical and social questions related to the acceptance of avatar robots at work considering which properties they should have, to what extent the current state of the art in social robotics is applicable, and which additional technical components need to be developed.
... Mechanisms to understand the distancing behavior of people with robots based on speech and gaze have already been proposed (Mumm & Mutlu, 2011). A great number of studies have been carried out based on static models of users and contexts of interaction to decide the appropriate proxemics (Dragone, Saunders, & Dautenhahn, 2015;Marquardt & Greenberg, 2012). Many studies have been conducted to identify the user activities and behavior as well (Gaglio, Re, & Morana, 2015;Sirithunge, Jayasekara, & Pathirana, 2017;Vitiello, Acampora, Staffa, Siciliano, & Rossi, 2017;Wu, Pan, Xiong, & Xu, 2014). ...
Chapter
Through combining robots’ power, consistency, and accuracy with humans’ creativity and flexibility, human-robot-interaction offers new ways of manufacturing. For a successful introduction of human-robot-interaction in manufacturing, it is important not only to consider the necessary change of qualification, but also to create a positive attitude towards this new technology as expectations trigger behavior and consequently influence quality of work. The study reported in this chapter analyzes how attitudes towards collaborative robots are influenced through interaction with an industrial robot.
... Participant feedback indicates that some of our heuristics or the implementation could be refined; for instance, a semantic data similarity (e.g., all location-related views) or contextual device aspects (e.g., physical device arrangements) are currently not represented, as they are hard to capture. For example, device proxemics [8,40] can currently only be sensed with external tracking systems, which are hardly applicable outside of research prototypes [34,49,62]. However, this might change as internal device sensors improve [31], allowing to better facilitate cross-device dependencies. ...
Conference Paper
We present Vistribute, a framework for the automatic distribution of visualizations and UI components across multiple heterogeneous devices. Our framework consists of three parts: (i) a design space considering properties and relationships of interactive visualizations, devices, and user preferences in multi-display environments; (ii) specific heuristics incorporating these dimensions for guiding the distribution for a given interface and device ensemble; and (iii) a web-based implementation instantiating these heuristics to automatically generate a distribution as well as providing interaction mechanisms for user-defined adaptations. In contrast to existing UI distribution systems, we are able to infer all required information by analyzing the visualizations and devices without relying on additional input provided by users or programmers. In a qualitative study, we let experts create their own distributions and rate both other manual distributions and our automatic ones. We found that all distributions provided comparable quality, hence validating our framework.
... Additionally, designing for shared-world AR involves the consideration of inter-player communication and proximity. Games have been used to explore bodily interactions between people, especially those interactions that involve awkwardness and touch [11,14,18]. Touch-based, or haptic, feedback has been used to encourage intimacy [8]. ...
Conference Paper
Augmented reality (AR) games have been growing in popularity in recent years. However, current AR games offer limited opportunities for a synchronous multiplayer experience. This paper introduces a model for designing AR experiences in which players inhabit a shared, real-time augmented environment and can engage in synchronous and collaborative interactions with other players. We explored the development of this model through the creation of Brick, a two-player mobile AR game at the room scale. We refined Brick over multiple rounds of iteration, and we used our playtests to investigate a range of issues involved in designing shared-world AR games. Our findings suggest that there are five major categories of interactions in a shared-world AR system: single-player, intrapersonal, multiplayer, interpersonal, and environmental. We believe that this model can support the development of collaborative AR games and new forms of social gameplay.
... Mechanisms to understand the distancing behavior of people with robots based on speech and gaze have already been proposed (Mumm & Mutlu, 2011). A great number of studies have been carried out based on static models of users and contexts of interaction to decide the appropriate proxemics (Dragone, Saunders, & Dautenhahn, 2015;Marquardt & Greenberg, 2012). Many studies have been conducted to identify the user activities and behavior as well (Gaglio, Re, & Morana, 2015;Kanda et al., 2009;Sirithunge, Jayasekara, & Pathirana, 2017;Vitiello, Acampora, Staffa, Siciliano, & Rossi, 2017;Wu, Pan, Xiong, & Xu, 2014). ...
Chapter
Human-like decision making skills are sought after during the design of social robots. On the one hand, such features enable a robot to be easily handled by its nonexpert user. On the other hand, the robot will have the capability of dealing with humans in such a way that the human will not be disturbed by the behavior of the robot. In an effort to introduce proxemicsbased etiquettes to a social robot, we have used a teleoperated robot to find human interest towards intelligent proxemic and conversational behavior of a robot. This chapter explains how body-based movements were perceived by a robot to consider appropriate approach behavior prior to an interaction. Engagement of humans during situation-cautious behavior of the robot upon a static approach behavior was examined during the study. During this approach physiological cues displayed by the humans were used by the robot to perceive their situations encountered with humans. As the robot approaches the subject after an analysis of physiological behavior of the subject, spatial constraints occur due to the movement of the robot could be demolished. Furthermore, utterances generated by the robot to initiate an interaction with the user, were decided by predicting the intentions of that individual based on displayed human cues. Results of the experiment confirms the fact that a more socially acceptable spatial and verbal behavior could be observed from the robot through situation-awareness.