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Habitwise distribution of flora in the IIT-Bombay campus.

Habitwise distribution of flora in the IIT-Bombay campus.

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The studies of biodiversity have now assumed greater significance as ecologists try desperately to document global biodiversity in the face of unprecedented perturbations, habitat loss and extinction rates. With advances in science and technology, we are on the verge of understanding the natural world while at the same time in real danger of destro...

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... with its unique geography and diverse bioclimatic regions, support a rich odonate fauna Adult odonates feed on mosquitoes, blackflies and other blood-sucking flies and act as an important biocontrol agent of these harmful insects In addition to the direct role of predators in ecosystem, their value as indicators of quality of the biotope is now being increasingly recognized. In the campus 37 species of odonates (Table 20) including eight unidentified were observed of these only the Ruddy Marsh skimmer was common in the entire campus. The campus had a number of pollution indicator species in the urban sector from the 28 species recorded with three exclusive to the sector. ...
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... honey bee can also indicate the productivity of the ecosystem. During the study insects living in colonies representing three orders were observed (Table 22). Of the three orders Hymenoptera was the dominant one with more species diversity in the vegetated sector than the urban sector. ...
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... indicate the number of colonies. Table 23: Distribution and abundance of several less represented insect orders in the IIT-Bombay campus. The other orders that were sighted in the campus included the Neuroptera, Orthoptera, Megaloptera, Thysanaura, Phasmoidea, Mantodae, Blattaria, Isoptera and Dermoptera (Table 23). ...
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... 23: Distribution and abundance of several less represented insect orders in the IIT-Bombay campus. The other orders that were sighted in the campus included the Neuroptera, Orthoptera, Megaloptera, Thysanaura, Phasmoidea, Mantodae, Blattaria, Isoptera and Dermoptera (Table 23). These orders were not very significant but are ecologically important as indicator species. ...
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... the present study two orders of class Arachnida were recorded viz. Araneae and Opiliones (Table 24). The order Opiliones was represented by Harvestman that was restricted to the V2 and the V5 sub sectors only. ...
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... 1,866 species of amphibians, or 30 percent of the total number of 6,221 described existing amphibian species, were deemed at risk of extinction by IUCN's 2008 Red List. In the IIT-Bombay campus six species of amphibians belonging to order Salientia were observed (Table 25). Of these four were identified up to the species level.And one frog and a toad remained unidentified and were observed in the urban sector only. ...
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... the campus two orders of reptiles were recorded i.e. Squamata and the Crocodilia (Table 26). In the order Squamata seven families of reptiles were observed. ...
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... diet, as a whole, is as diverse as the order. The 102 species exhibited nine different feeding types viz Herbivory, Omnivory, Granivory, Insectivory, Nectarivory, Frugivory, Piscivory, Mixed diet and Scavengers (Table 27). The omnivores comprised of 29 species belonging to 23 genera and 12 families representing 7 orders, of these 16 species were common to the entire campus while 10 species were exclusive to the vegetated sector while only three were restricted to the urban sector. ...
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... 1,094 species of mammals, or about 20 percent of the total 5,416 described mammal species, were deemed endangered or vulnerable to extinction by IUCN's 2007 Red List. In the IIT campus seven orders covering seven families were recorded (Table 28). The domestic animals were found to out number the wild mammals. ...
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... During the present study except for the trees the other flora was studied in three phases. Table 29 clearly indicates the pattern of variations that have occurred in the campus. The tree saplings were seen in large numbers in the entire campus, however the survival rate was much lower than expected. ...
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... the number of trees in the vegetated sector is less compared to the urban sector as seen in Table 31, which also points out to the fact that the introduced tree species were given protection and they increased in numbers while the vegetated sector is exploited despite its natural species diversity. Table 32 shows the comparison of the flora that is exclusive to either the urban or vegetated sector. The table however gives a wrong picture with greater species diversity in the urban sector. ...

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