FIG 4 - uploaded by Alberto Vicentini
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Habit of drosera amazonica at Igarapé Cachoeira. The tall stems and long internodes may represent an adaptation to occasional flooding. The small green subulate leaves on the ground around the drosera belong to the carnivorous plant utricularia subulata L. (Lentibulariaceae).

Habit of drosera amazonica at Igarapé Cachoeira. The tall stems and long internodes may represent an adaptation to occasional flooding. The small green subulate leaves on the ground around the drosera belong to the carnivorous plant utricularia subulata L. (Lentibulariaceae).

Context in source publication

Context 1
... members of these taxa are endemic to this type of vegetation on oligotrophic soils (Vicentini 2004). drosera amazonica occurs in large populations, the individuals often growing very close together & 4). It has been collected in flower in the months of January, December, and June, suggesting that this species does not have a specific flowering period. ...

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... Corky or spongy tissue of low density Increases propagule buoyancy van der Pijl (1972) Waxy, cuticularized epidermis Prevents imbibition and sinking of propagules Sculthorpe (1967) Surface with furrows, pits or hairs Traps air bubbles, which increases the buoyancy of propagules Rivadavia et al. (2009) ...
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