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Ground Floor of Edirne Station (T.U. Precidency) (Yıldız 2008 ). 

Ground Floor of Edirne Station (T.U. Precidency) (Yıldız 2008 ). 

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Conference Paper
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The alterations occurring in social building due to developing technology and globalism also affect architecture by resulting in the conservation, rehabilitation and reuse of the architectonic buildings. Among the buildings that will be conserved, the industrial heritage is one of the most significant conservational topics which previously had no i...

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... after then it started to fall short in meeting the demand. Then, it began to be used for local train services. This was followed by long years of idleness, which caused dilapidation (Hasol 1989). The building was used a mailing centre for sending packages to prisoners of war during the Second World War, then as a set for several films, in 1973 as a haven for the Renault-Barrault Theatre Company, and as an auction hall during the rebuilt of Hotel Drouot (www.musee- orsay.dr). Although, Gare D’Orsay was decided to be sold first since it had lost its function and been left idle; citizens of Paris who became conscious and gained experienced after the issue concerning Les Halles in Paris, blocked the destruction and the building was took under preservation in 1978. Following a ten years of public discussion, it was decided to re-designate the building as a museum which would contribute to the cultural development of Paris (Hasol 1989) (Picture 2). In the museum designed by Italian architect Gae Aulenti; new spaces were added to the main space by partitions, the roof was partially made transparent, and lateral naves were turned into an exhibition halls with double-sized height. Rooms of the hotel were added to the museum, whereas the hotel’s restaurant was kept to serve for the same function. Aulenti achieved her self-set target, as she managed to create a highly-ordered, comfortable and perfectly-lit exhibition space which would guide the visitors without tiring them out and would guarantee the highest level of perception (Hasol 1989; musee-orsay.fr). This act of preservation, or in other words reuse, could not be performed flawlessly even in a country like France where preservation is a well-known operation and despite the low-interfering nature of the museum function (Hasol 1989) (Figure 1). The Terminal Railroad Association, founded in 1889, built the biggest and most beautiful station of America, St. Louis Union Station, in 1894. This building was designed by architect Theodore C. Link, a former railroad worker, with three main sections, and a big hall with Romanesque vaults and golden leaves. This biggest train station of America, which had an eclectic Romanesque style, was accepted as a National Historic Landmark in 1976 (Picture 3). It continued to serve until 1978, but it was sold to Oppenheimer Properties in 1979. In 1985, it was put into service as the USA’s most expensive reuse project (stlouisunionstation.com). Adaptation in its new function became easier, since a part of the building was originally designed as a hotel. In 1985, the station building was renovated by a firm called Hellmuth, Obata and Kassabaum (HOK), and started to serve as a complex composed of a 550-room hotel, a shopping mall and restaurants. The biggest challenge in the entire project was tying the hotel/train shed space to the grand old headhouse, and then tying retail space into this (Picture 4). Budapest has two beautiful train stations. The most famous one of them is Nyugati (West) station. The first Hungarian train that went to Vac in 1846 passed through the current location of Nyugati Station where iron and glass were perfectly used. Nyugati was built by Gustave Eiffel, who also built the Eiffel Tower, in 1874-1877. It is both an architectural and engineering success with its huge entrance hole (146x25 m) (aviewoncities.com). The roof of the three-storey part located on the right and left of the entrance ends with two towers. On top of the entrance hole, there is a saddle roof made up of steel beams and glass, which provides a transparent and relieving space (Picture 5). Today there is Mc Donald's in the place of the historical restaurant inside the Nyugati terminal of Budapest, Hungary. This restaurant is in harmony with a well-lit, green, colorful and crowded environment. These terminals are lucky buildings as they continue to function without facing demolition (Tümer 1991) (Picture 6). This station was built by Mimar Kemaleddin Bey, who had previously worked as an assistant to Jachmund, the architect of Sirkeci Station and influences of Sirkeci Station are visible on the building. Edirne Station which was one of artworks of national architecture period was inaugurated in 1910. It is now being used as the Presidency Building (Büyükdemir 1999) (Picture 7). The building, which has various oriels, is similar to Sirkeci Station in general. Steel beams are used in its floorings and it has a load-bearing wall system composed of bricks and ashlars. The entrance that is reminiscent of a portal is one of the most prominent parts of the building, where influences of traditional Turkish architecture are highly observed. A simple and modest masonry is visible. On the front façade of the building, there are two cylindrical towers highlighted with an onion dome. While the windows of lower floors are wider and taller, those of upper floors are narrower and shorter. These windows are covered with straight pointy coves (Y ı ld ı z 2008) (Figure 2). The station building had been used until it was passed on to Edirne Academy of Engineering and Architecture in 1977. Then, Trakya University opened it to public use in 1992 as a practice hotel. In 1998, it was re-designated for presidential and additional services of the university (Büyükdemir, 1999) and put into service. Due to these changes in the function of the building, it has undergone numerous repairs. It is used today as the Presidential Building of Trakya University, and this function is suitable for monumental characteristics of the building and also a correct preference since it is a public space. It is also a positive example since this new function has been possible without necessity to make any external additions to the building. Mudanya Station is more palatial than the other examples. It was originally built as the Customs Building by the French in 1849, and it became a customs building and train station in 1881 after Mudanya-Bursa Railway and station buildings were completed (Durak 2003)]. It has a rectangular and symmetrical design if we exclude the two floors structure on the right with reference to the sea. The part where the entrance exists also has got two floors. Single-floor rectangular structures and adjacent square structures are located on two sides of this section. Four rooms are located in the four corners of the entrance hall which divides the mezzanine into two independent sections, each of which looks at different gallery spaces. The building on the left were used as the depot of the customs with its addition, whereas the center part of the building at the upper floor and the left side of the mezzanine were used by administrative units of the customs. Other sections served the station. The structure on the right served as the waiting room, the structure adjacent to the above was used as luggage place and storeroom, the right part of the mezzanine and the rooms to the right of the ground floor were used as administrative offices, ticket booth and room of the station master. The two-floor structure on the right is the administrative building of the Mudanya-Bursa line (Araz 1995). Ground floor windows of the entrance section have obtuse vaults, whereas the mezzanine has square and upper floor windows have rectangular shapes. Windows were framed and keystones were located in the middle (Drawing 6). Similarly, the structures on two sides of the entrance and the windows of additions thereto have framed windows with obtuse vaults. Corners of the entrance building are decoratively covered with stones. The ground floor and the upper floor are divided with a wide plaster (Picture 8). The building functioned this way until train services were abolished in 1953, since they were not economic and continued to serve as the customs building for a while, and then it became the property of the local municipality. Until 1990, it had been used as a training school for the municipality. Station buildings were restored in 1990 to be used for touristic purposes (mudanya.gen.tr), and these buildings started to serve as hotels. In the renovation works, while the exterior façade was preserved, comprehensive alternations were made in its interior spaces and building system. The semi- open passage in the middle was covered with glassware during the restoration works, and the ground floor of the building was designated for hotel lobby and administrative units, whereas upper floors were designed as hotel rooms. Buildings that were used as storehouses became ballroom and restaurant, while their additional buildings adjacent to them were designed as cafes, bars and kitchens. The two-floor lodging located at the far end of these buildings was rearranged as technical service units and bedrooms (Yıldız, 2008) (Figure 3). Gazi Station, which is located within the Atatürk Forest Farm in Ankara, was designed in 1926 by the Architect Ahmet Burhanettin. It is one of the first st monumental station buildings of the 1 National Architecture Period (Sobutay, 1996). The building was planned symmetrically and with a rectangular design, the longer side is parallel to the rail line. The entrance hall, located in the middle of the main building, has a square design with a single floor. On both sides of the hall, two-storey narrow buildings that were used as lodging are located. Alongside these buildings, there are single-floor buildings built as waiting rooms and other spaces serving for other functions. The upper parts of wide door openings at both facades of the entrance hall, are covered with pointy vaults, and small windows at such gaps provide adequate amount of light for the hall. Hipped roofs with wide eaves cover the buildings that constitute the building, and eaves supported by buttresses are put on entrance parts (Picture 9). Since small booths became able to provide the required service as the station is located on a suburban line, functions of the station building were rearranged in the 2000s. ...

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