Figure 10 - uploaded by Chandima Gunasena
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Grass covered sloppy areas Figure 10 shows the connected grass covered sloppy areas with the earthen canals with grass cover. These hydrologic controls help to slow down the runoff water and increase the infiltration and the time of concentration. Artistically carved steps on the rock were used to slow down the water velocity. Those are appeared as water falls during the rainy season Figure 11. 

Grass covered sloppy areas Figure 10 shows the connected grass covered sloppy areas with the earthen canals with grass cover. These hydrologic controls help to slow down the runoff water and increase the infiltration and the time of concentration. Artistically carved steps on the rock were used to slow down the water velocity. Those are appeared as water falls during the rainy season Figure 11. 

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Hydraulic civilization was prominent in Anuradhapura and Polonnaruwa eras till the 13 century Anuradha Senaviratne (1987). Cascade system was identified as the managing land and water systems in dry zone areas Madduma Bandara in 1995. Sustainable system of managing each and every component of the landscape and water resources was discussed in detai...

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... Some scholars have reexamined Sri Lanka's traditional water management system partly for the purpose of enhancing modern day climate resilience actions. Some emphasized the implications for drought mitigation and rain water harvesting [7][8][9][10][11], agricultural developments [5,12,13], ecosystem management [2,[14][15][16][17], and socio-economic development [4,[18][19][20]. Literature shows that a similar tank system existed in semiarid southern India, but its main purpose was to provide water for paddy cultivation [21,22]. ...
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