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Graph showing actual learning ability with Elearning techniques and traditional teaching techniques  

Graph showing actual learning ability with Elearning techniques and traditional teaching techniques  

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Conference Paper
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Global e-learning revenue was estimated at $US46.6 Billion in 2016 but trends are slowing and providers must evolve to meet the expectations and drivers in a changing marketplace. There is little consensus regarding predictors of successful e-learning as participants have different intentions when engaging with online learning and these influence t...

Citations

... Bangladesh has started following online education practicing in unplanned way with little preparation, no training and limited resources. Before COVID-19 pandemic, a study survey got positive result in [15] that analyzed, all academic staffs highly responded to new emerging e-learning policy rather than being used to study only using traditional education techniques. Figure 5 shows comparative and graphical view of e-learning responses for students and teachers category. ...
... E-learning has been evolving rapidly, from purely Web-based to mobile and ubiquitous learning experiences, thus providing even more personalized solutions that better suit each individual need. For that reason, institutions, teachers and learners seemingly embrace e-learning [2] and consider it among the most innovative learning mediums [3]. In fact, within the past ten years, we witness a strong ongoing growth of research interests in e-learning [4], [5] and the emergence of technologies that better support user interactivity [6] and content sharing [7]. ...
Conference Paper
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Student monitoring, the most common practice in Learning Analytics (LA), has become easier and more efficient thanks to the use of tracking approach that consists of collecting data of users and of their interactions throughout learning platforms. While LA gives considerable assistance to the tutors in the tasks of monitoring online learning, it also creates major drawbacks for the learners. For instance, tracking approach in LA raises many privacy questions. As for the learners, knowing that their personal data are being used, even for educational purposes, they could radically change their perception on e-learning technologies. Not to mention that these concerns would have a strong impact, sometimes very negatively, on not only their behaviors but also their learning outcomes. To better understand the side effect of LA, more particularly the privacy issues in e-learning, the research effort presented in this paper covers two main aspects. First, it outlines various tracking approaches in e-learning. Second, it analyzes how the learners perceive the use of their personal data and the related privacy issues. To do so, an experiment has been carried out with the participation of students from three different universities in France and one university in Germany. The major contribution of this paper is the awareness-raising of privacy concerns in exploiting tracking data in e-learning, which are often overlooked by researchers and learning content providers.
... E-learning has been evolving rapidly, from purely Web-based to mobile and ubiquitous learning experiences, thus providing even more personalized solutions that better suit each individual need. For that reason, institutions, teachers and learners seemingly embrace e-learning [2] and consider it among the most innovative learning mediums [3]. In fact, within the past ten years, we witness a strong ongoing growth of research interests in e-learning [4], [5] and the emergence of technologies that better support user interactivity [6] and content sharing [7]. ...
... experiences, thus providing even more personalized solutions that better suit each individual needs. For that reason, institutions, teachers and learners seemingly embrace e-learning (Popovici and Mironov, 2015) and consider it among the most innovative learning mediums (Gaur et al., 2015). In fact, within the past ten years, we witness a strong ongoing growth of research interests in e-learning (Scott and Vanoirbeek, 2007) and an emergence of technologies that better support user interaction (Gamage et al., 2014) and content sharing (Lau et al., 2013). ...
Article
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INTRODUCTION Learning helps in acquiring knowledge or skill. Traditional learning in the form of didactic lecture is based on physical interaction between learner and teacher. 1 The traditional didactic lecture creates an instructor-centered classroom setting in which students are more passive listeners than active learners. 2 It remains and is likely to persist as an important teaching-learning method in higher education. Today is the era of information technology. E-learning, which is defined as the use of internet technologies to deliver a wide array of solutions that enhance knowledge and performance. It has become an important component of today's teaching-learning process in higher education institutes. 3,4 Indian Universities are taking on this newer methodology, mostly in a blended format. M-learning follows the same principles of E-learning. It is done using smaller electronic tools like smartphones, tablets etc. The attributes of M-learning are spontaneous, personal, informal, contextual, portable, ubiquitous, ambient, unobtrusive or pervasive. 5 As lifelong learning is required in the medical students M-learning offers a great platform ABSTRACT Background: We are living in an era of technology where smart phones and hence social media have entered into many aspects of our life. Social media tools are gaining attention in medical education as well. Therefore, this study was done to find out the effect of M-learning via WhatsApp over the traditional method and also to know the students' perception towards M-learning via WhatsApp. Methods: The study included 60 sixth semester students and they were divided into two groups of 30 each. 4 sessions were conducted on nutrition and occupational health. For the first 2 sessions, group I was intervention group (TL method was WhatsApp) and group II was control group (TL method was lecture). For the next 2 sessions, group II was interventional group (TL method was WhatsApp) and group I was control group (TL method was lecture). To assess the effectiveness of WhatsApp intervention, a test was conducted using 60 MCQs. To evaluate the participant's perception towards M-learning via WhatsApp, a feedback questionnaire was used. Data was analyzed using SPSS 20. Results: There was a statistically significant difference between the 2 groups of students. Interventional-group perceived WhatsApp sessions to be effective than traditional lecture. Conclusions: In our study we found a significant difference between gains of knowledge from WhatsApp compared to didactic lectures. Students were favourably inclined to use the WhatsApp and welcome its role in enhancing their learning experience.