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Goal No. 7 from the Millennium Declaration. Source: Adapted from UN (2010).  

Goal No. 7 from the Millennium Declaration. Source: Adapted from UN (2010).  

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The concept of sustainable development from 1980 to the present has evolved into definitions of the three pillars of sustainability (social, economic and environmental). The recent economic and financial crisis has helped to newly define economic sustainability. It has brought into focus the economic pillar and cast a question mark over the sustain...

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... into twenty-one quantifiable targets that are measured by sixty indicators. Goal 7 (to ensure environmental sustainability) includes four targets and ten original indicators, plus three indicators we have derived from the MDG 2010 Report . The indicators provide information about achieving these goals within certain time periods in each country (Fig. ...
Context 2
... quantifies and numerically benchmarks the environmental performance of a country's policies. It was developed by Yale University and Columbia University in collaboration with the World Economic Forum and the Joint Research Centre of the European Commission (Emerson et al., 2010). The EPI focuses on two overarching environmental objectives: reducing environmental stresses on human health and promoting ecosystem vitality and sound natural resource management. ...

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... We also exemplify how informative is the evidence provided by the conditional approach to guide more thoroughly comparative assessments. As a result, in real-world case studies, intervening at a very detailed level can improve the effectiveness of the performance assessment exercise, making processes evolve towards more sustainable and productive systems at social, economic, and environmental levels (Moldan et al., 2012). ...
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