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Geometry and design parameters of hybrid joint.

Geometry and design parameters of hybrid joint.

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... the first type of joints, namely type A, only the adhesive is involved in the bonding of the joint, while in the second type, namely type B joint, a bolt is introduced aside from the adhesive in the double lap steel-GFRP part. The geometry and main dimensions of the joints are presented in Figure 1. The "blind" edge of the steel component (right edge in Figure 1) is in- clined and bonded to the core of the sandwich con- figuration. ...
Context 2
... geometry and main dimensions of the joints are presented in Figure 1. The "blind" edge of the steel component (right edge in Figure 1) is in- clined and bonded to the core of the sandwich con- figuration. The total length of the joints, L t , is equal to 550 mm. ...
Context 3
... manufacturing of the hybrid joints specimens was conducted at Estaleiros Navais de Peniche SA shipyard in Portugal. Firstly the flat composite skin was laminated (upper skin in Figure 1) with the ap- plication of 4 layers of fabric glass and vinylester res- in (see Figure 2). Then the Balsa core and the steel components were positioned above the flat compo- site skin. ...
Context 4
... steel component was previously sand blasted to Sa 2½ in both sides so as to achieve a per- fect bonding between all adherents. In the sequence the inclined skin was laminated (lower skin in Figure 1), again with 4 layers of fabric glass and resin. A peel ply, a release film, a breather and a bagging film were placed successively around the laid-up compo- site-to-steel joint and secured to the tool surface with ...
Context 5
... failure mode (see Figures 9 and 10), in all specimens bond failure initiated at the area be- tween the inclined steel tip and the balsa core (see circle in Figure 10). In the sequence, failure propa- gated along the bond line of the inclined steel part and the balsa core. ...
Context 6
... failure mode (see Figures 9 and 10), in all specimens bond failure initiated at the area be- tween the inclined steel tip and the balsa core (see circle in Figure 10). In the sequence, failure propa- gated along the bond line of the inclined steel part and the balsa core. ...
Context 7
... is evident from these figures that as the number of loading cycles increases, the stiffness of the specimen is gradually reduced. Exception to this is specimen A_4 (3-30 kN, Figure 13), which evidently resist to this particular loading and produced slight stiffness degradation even after 1.2 x 10 6 cycles, compared to the rest of the specimens. ...
Context 8
... propagated along the bond line of the inclined steel part and the balsa core. Total failure of the composite skins and the balsa core took place in the area of the inclined steel part (see Figure 14). In one type B joint, after the steel- balsa interface bond failure, debonding propagated between the skin and the steel and then stopped at the area of the bolt, which seemed that it kept both steel and skin in one place. ...

Citations

... Finally, the overlap length between the steel parts and the sandwich panels are 404 mm for all of the specimens (see Fig. 2). [15][16][17][18][19][20][21][22][23][24][25][26][27][28][29][30][31][32][33] The composite system of the sandwich skins consisted of four layers of 813 g/m2 biaxial stitched E-glass fabric from Metyx Composites together with a Scott Bader Crystic VE679PA vinylester resin fabric was a bi-axially stitched E-glass and a Vinylester resin system, Crystic VE 679 PA, was used to impregnate the laminated fabrics. The ProBalsa Standard wood 155 kg/m3 from DIAB Balsa wood has been used as the core of the sandwich plate, whereas the steel used was of AH36 grade with density of 7860 kg⁄mˆ3 with isotropic, elastic-plastic characteristics. ...
... The weight of each specimen was measured using an overhead crane and was observed 150 kg (10% of the total weight is related [15][16][17][18][19][20][21][22][23][24][25][26][27][28][29][30][31][32][33] to the sandwich panel). It would be about 365 kg, in case of full-steel specimens. ...
... The material properties used in the developed FEM models are listed in Table 1 [5,17]. The balsa core was considered as a homogeneous orthotropic material. ...
Article
Full-text available
Exposure to aggressive environmental conditions and specific loads necessitate precise material selection and manufacturing techniques. Techniques such as overlamination, welding, adhesive bonding, mechanical joining, and hybrid joining are currently used to join different marine structures components. This review groups the published investigations to cover a wide range of geometries, materials, and loading types and organizes them in a chronological context. Comparing joining methods shows that each technique has a considerable potential to be employed in the various marine industry sectors corresponding to the desired application. Besides the significant strength, poor fatigue life is a concerning issue for welding. One of the most crucial challenges in mechanical fastening is drilling holes in composite materials that damages the fibres. Adhesive bonding provides superior advantages such as higher strength to weight ratio and fatigue life, whilst the susceptibility to environmental conditions must be considered. To overcome the drawbacks of each approach, the hybrid joining technique is introduced which combines two different joining methods to achieve the optimum performance. To have the most durable, and reliable structure, major criteria such as the structure application, the fabrication process, and the tolerance of adverse environment must be considered to design the marine structures.