Figure 3 - uploaded by Alex Augusto Gonçalves
Content may be subject to copyright.
General appearance of the skin, gills, and eyes of fresh carapeba and after 18 days of storage in flaked ice.  

General appearance of the skin, gills, and eyes of fresh carapeba and after 18 days of storage in flaked ice.  

Source publication
Article
Full-text available
Considering the importance of sensory schemes for the evaluation of the freshness of different fish species, and the fact that carapeba (Eucinostomus gula) is an important commercial marine fish species in Northeastern Brazil, the objective of this study was to evaluate the freshness and shelf life of this fish during 18 days stored in ice. Changes...

Similar publications

Article
Full-text available
The present study investigates antioxidant properties and storage stability of grape seed extract (GSE) and papaya seed extract (PSE). The effect of heat showed significant decrease whereas wide range of pH showed increase in its antioxidant activity. The storage days study indicated that, there was slight change in antioxidant activity (AOA) of GS...

Citations

... As for turbot (Scophthalmus maximus), there are 9 parameters in its QIM scheme with a total score of 20 [25]. For carapeba (Eucinostomus gula), the QIM sheet includes 9 attributes and a 0-19 QI score range [26]. The QIM of iced gutted hybrid tambatinga (Colossoma macropomum× Piaractus brachypomum) has 10 attributes and 18 points [27]. ...
Article
Background Quality monitoring and/or assessment are parts of a freshness/quality control system, which is of utmost importance for fresh seafood, especially Scombridae fish. The quality index method (QIM) is a simple, convenient, unique, and reliable tool to determine the sensory status and estimate the remaining shelf life of aqua products. Objective This study aimed to develop a QIM scheme for chilled stored yellowfin tuna and apply the protocol in the fish quality evaluation and storage time estimation. Method Eight gutted yellowfin tuna of 20, 30, and 40 kg up were used in the study. Five panelists participated in the QIM development, training and application. Control and/or validation analyses were sensory assessment by a control sheet, total volatile basic nitrogen (TVB-N) quantification, and total viable count (TVC) determination. Chilled storage of tuna was performed in liquid ice and traditional crushed block ice. Partial least square regression (PLS-R) was conducted on quality index (QI) dataset over storage time to find the regression line and prediction accuracy. Results The established QIM protocol for gutted yellowfin tuna comprised 6 attributes (namely, color of whole fish, odor of whole fish and flesh, eyes, appearance of whole fish, flesh color and flesh texture) and a maximal QI of 15. The PLS-R showed that QI could be used to estimate the remaining time with a precision of ± 2.0 and 1.4 days for fish stored in slurry ice and crushed ice, respectively. The TVB-N content in the fish flesh maintained below the acceptable level of 25 mg N/100 g throughout the storage period, which made the parameter impractical to detect the fish shelf life. The TVC overreached the allowable level of 107 CFU/g around the time of fish rejection by the sensory method. Conclusion The developed QIM scheme for yellowfin tuna showed to be more advantageous in detecting fish quality changes compared to the control sensory method and could be used to estimate the fish's remaining shelf life.
Article
Full-text available
Fish is a high nutritional value matrix of which production and consumption have been increasing in the last years. Advancements in the efficient evaluation of freshness are essential to optimize the quality assessment, to improve consumer safety, and to reduce raw material losses. Therefore, it is necessary to use rapid, nondestructive, and objective methodologies to evaluate the quality of this matrix. Quality Index Method (QIM) is a tool applied to indicate fish freshness through a sensory evaluation performed by a group of assessors. However, the use of QIM as an official method for quality assessment is limited by the protocol, sampling size, specificities of the species, storage conditions, and assessor's experience, which make this method subjective. Also, QIM may present divergences regarding the development of microorganisms and chemical analysis. In this way, novel quality evaluation methods such as electronic noses, electronic tongues, machine vision system, and colorimetric sensors have been proposed, and novel technologies such as proteomics and mitochondrial analysis have been developed. In this review, the weaknesses of QIM were exposed, and novel methodologies for quality evaluation were presented. The consolidation of these novel methodologies and their use as methods of quality assessment are an alternative to sensory methods, and their understanding enables a more effective fish quality control.