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Garden cities of Tomorrow (Howard, 1969). 

Garden cities of Tomorrow (Howard, 1969). 

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Creating a resilient urban matrix has become a fundamental issue due to natural and human caused disasters, economic and ecological crises last few decades. Subsequently, integrating productivity in cities via landscape and planning tools and developing a sustainable infrastructure become inevitable. This study explores the role of productive lands...

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... The "Cities of resilience" metaphor is a promising tool to investigate the connection between the community's perception of nature and the built environment. Communities form the resilient cities of the future and create socially and ecologically resilient environments that shape conscious communities (Akyol and Eşbah, 2013). Building landscape resilience inspires the cultivation of the landscape's capacity to recover from disruption and live with changes and uncertainties. ...
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The cities are responsible for natural and human-made disasters, and other dangers that occur due to environmental destruction caused by the activities carried out in them. Besides, they are the biggest victims of these disasters, shocks and stresses. The capacity of cities to be prepared for, respond to and adapt to the problems, dangers, disasters and risks they face determines their urban resilience. The resilience of a city depends on the excellent management of urbanization. Under these circumstances, the permaculture approach as a design methodology for sustainable human habitats needs to be developed as a new strategy. Because permaculture takes inspiration from how natural systems self-organize for resilience and productivity. Permaculture, which sees the problem as a solution, is thought to be the right strategy in urban landscape resilience studies.
... The endeavors to form sustainable and resilient cities have projected a variety of ways, strategies, and perspectives throughout history. Some of these recommendations have achieved success where some of them have proved unsuccessful (Akyol et al 2013). ...
... Undeniably, as communities form the resilient cities of future, by creating ecologically and socially resilient environments, it is of great importance to shape conscious communities within them. Consequently, not only urban planners, landscape architects, and developers have the responsibility for the design of the physical structure of urban environments, but they are also liable for the design of the communities that reside them (Akyol et al 2013). ...
... The endeavors to form sustainable and resilient cities have projected a variety of ways, strategies, and perspectives throughout history. Some of these recommendations have achieved success where some of them have proved unsuccessful (Akyol et al 2013). ...
... Undeniably, as communities form the resilient cities of future, by creating ecologically and socially resilient environments, it is of great importance to shape conscious communities within them. Consequently, not only urban planners, landscape architects, and developers have the responsibility for the design of the physical structure of urban environments, but they are also liable for the design of the communities that reside them (Akyol et al 2013). ...
Chapter
“Resilient cities are those which have the ability to absorb, recover and prepare for future shocks (environmental, economic, social and institutional),” while they encourage sustainable development, prosperity, and comprehensive growth (OECD 2018).
... Productive landscapes, on the other hand, support the resiliency by the creation of multi--functional open urban space networks that complement built environment (Bohn & Viljoen, 2005 ). Another definition of urban agriculture is the production of fruit and vegetables where the highest yields per urban square are provided (Akyol & Esbas Tuncay, 2013). In Cubuk Dam case, the soil ability and the total area sprawled on 7 km long urban space is estimated to provide the highest yield. ...
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Historical environments / cultural built heritage areas are the accumulations and products of the civilizations of the human communities who lived in the settlement areas from prehistoric to the present. Cities gain their own identity with these values. For these reasons, historical environments / cultural built heritage areas are the mirrors of social identity, and they must be carefully protected, guarded and handed over to future generations under better conditions than they are handed over to us, by taking precautions to keep the verbal, written and especially architectural culture within them alive. Based on the theory that cities are living organisms and that historical environments / cultural built heritage areas are an important part of this system, a proposal process that includes different stages, methods and interventions has been developed for the conservation of historical environments / cultural built heritage areas with different characteristics through the treatment process of a living organism. The aim of this study is to discuss "the concept of conservation qualitatively" with the questions of what, why, how and for whom we should conserve in the proposal process. This discussion fictionalizes the intervention types in urban conservation, especially the demolition and reconstruction intervention and the intervention process through the organ transplant analogy.