Table 7 - uploaded by Richard Bergman
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Fuel and electrical energy used to produce a cubic meter of planed dry lumber.

Fuel and electrical energy used to produce a cubic meter of planed dry lumber.

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Article
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Environmental impacts associated with the building industry have become of increasing importance. Materials and energy consumed during manufacture of building materials such as lumber affect a building’s environmental performance. This study determined environmental impacts of manufacturing hardwood lumber in the southeastern US using the life-cycl...

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... and energy resources consumed to manufacture 1.0 m 3 of planed dry hardwood lumber are shown in Table 3. Table 7 shows on-site energy input values unallocated and allo- cated to planed dry lumber. Unallocated values were calculated from material and energy resources found in Table 3 and were the sum of all fuel and electricity inputs to the process. ...

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Environmental impacts associated with the building industry have become of increasing importance. Materials and energy consumed during manufacture of building materials such as lumber affect a building's environmental performance. This study determined environmental impacts of manufacturing hardwood lumber in the southeastern US using the life-cycl...

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... Previous studies(Bergman, 2007; M.E. Puettmann et al., 2010;Puettmann and Wilson, 2005;Bergman and Bowe, 2010; Maureen E. Puettmann et al., 2010) utilizing the cradle-to-gate framework concluded that the lumber footprint of these forests varied from 0.4 to 2.1 tCO 2 /t (median: 0.7 tCO 2 /t). ...
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... Additionally, planer shavings are created in the planing process. Redwood lumber is planed relatively lightly as indicated by the small amount of planar shavings generated (6.47 OD kg/m 3 ) compared with that of other lumber products (Bergman and Bowe 2008, 2010, 2012Puettmann and others 2010). The planed lumber is graded, trimmed, sorted, and stacked before packaging. ...
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... A number of studies have investigated the effects of resource consumption in sawmilling and the resultant environmental profiles. These studies have revealed that the consumption of resources results in the discharge of a variety of gases in different quantities into the environment (Kinjo et al. 2005; Eshun et al. 2010; Puettmann et al. 2010; Bergman and Bowe 2012; Tellnes et al. 2012). Eshun et al. (2010) highlighted that the environmental emissions are different between countries and sawmills as a result of the different technologies, methods, and environmental standards applied. ...
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... In this study, the investigated product was the rough green sawn timber of the Shorea species. Volume is normally used as the unit of measure for sawn timber (Milota et al. 2005; Bergman and Bowe 2012; Martínez-Alonso and Berdasco 2015). Therefore, the functional unit for the carbon footprint assessment in this study was standardized as per-unit volume basis for 1.0 m 3 of Light Red Meranti and Dark Red Meranti rough green sawn timber. ...
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... Most wood products consume more energy per cubic meter of final product during the manufacturing stage than redwood decking. For making hardwood lumber in the southeastern United States, cumulative allocated energy consumption for one m 3 of planed dry hardwood lumber is 5,860 MJ/m 3 with 66% from wood fuel (Bergman and Bowe 2012). The values listed in Puettmann et al. (2010) and Bergman and Bowe (2012) studies use mass allocation. ...
... For making hardwood lumber in the southeastern United States, cumulative allocated energy consumption for one m 3 of planed dry hardwood lumber is 5,860 MJ/m 3 with 66% from wood fuel (Bergman and Bowe 2012). The values listed in Puettmann et al. (2010) and Bergman and Bowe (2012) studies use mass allocation. The present study allocates all primary energy to redwood decking and none to its residues. ...
... Primary energy is energy embodied in the original resources such as crude oil and coal before conversion. However, cumulative unallocated energy for manufacturing redwood decking is still only 26% of southeastern hardwood lumber (Bergman and Bowe 2012). The low cumulative energy for redwood decking occurred because of minimal use of kiln drying, which is the most energyintensive part of producing dry lumber products. ...
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