Fructose, glucose, and sucrose diet effect on bone metabolism. 

Fructose, glucose, and sucrose diet effect on bone metabolism. 

Source publication
Article
Full-text available
With people aging, osteoporosis is expected to increase notably. Nutritional status is a relatively easily-modified risk factor, associated with many chronic diseases, and is involved in obesity, diabetes, and coronary heart disease (CHD), along with osteoporosis. Nutrients, such as fats, sugars, and proteins, play a primary function in bone metabo...

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... data show that bone calcification was different between the fructose diet-and the HFD-fed mice groups, and all this evidence might account for the difference in the elastic modulus between the fructose diet-fed mice and the HFD-fed mice. The positive and negative effects of the fructose diet on bone metabolism are listed in Table 2. BV/TV, bone volume fraction; Tb.Th, trabecular thickness; Tb.Sp, trabecular separation, TRAP, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase; BMC, bone mineral content; BMD, bone mineral density; ALP, alkaline phosphatase; Ct.Ar, cortical bone area; Ct.Th, cortical bone thickness; vTMD, cortical volumetric tissue mineral density. ...
Context 2
... accordance with bone health, an increase in glucose diet consumption could be of concern to researchers, rather than the current focus on fructose diet consumption elevation associated with HFCS-55 beverage intakes [16]. Both the positive and negative effects of glucose diet on bone metabolism are listed in Table 2. ...
Context 3
... we should control dietary sugar intake, which might provide an opportunity to improve individual bone health. Both the positive and negative effects of sucrose diet on bone metabolism are listed in Table 2. ...

Similar publications

Article
Full-text available
As a consequence of rapid growth, broiler chickens are more susceptible to infection as well as bone fractures that result in birds being culled. Intestinal infection/inflammation has been demonstrated to promote bone loss in mice and humans. Given this link, we hypothesize that therapeutics that target the gut can benefit bone health. To test this...

Citations

... The report showed that acute high amount intake of cola (2 litres) can cause an increase in urinary calcium excretion as oxalate or phosphate. The culprit of these increase in urinary calcium excretion is thought to be related not only to one component of cola but several ingredients like the type of added sugar as sucrose or glucose can lower urine pH which in turn can enhance calcium excretion while fructose did not affect urine pH (23,24). Also, add acidulants like phosphoric acid and citric acid to enhance flavour which leads to urine acidification. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Carbonated beverages are very popular worldwide. Carbonated beverage consumption vast increase raises great health concerns regarding their effect on calcium homeostasis besides obesity and renal function. Carbonated beverages sugar content, caffeine, and acidulant all can affect in a way or another calcium absorption, metabolism and excretion. The latter has direct effect on teeth, bone and general wellbeing. This study aims to reveal the effect of sub-chronic intake of carbonated beverage on urinary pH, crystalluria, calcium excretion. Methods: 21 healthy volunteers have been recruited in this study (9 males and 12 females) abstain for any carbonated beverages for at least the previous 4 weeks before participating in this study. Urine has been collected over 24 hours, the next day each volunteer has to drink 250 ml of carbonated beverage (Pepsi®) daily for 3 weeks. On the last day, urine was collected again over 24hr. pH, crystalluria, and calcium in urine have been measured. Results: Urine pH and crystalluria after 3 weeks' intake of 250 ml of carbonated beverage did not statistically differ from urine pH before the intake. Although, there was a trend toward reduction in pH and an increase in crystalluria. Total calcium excretion in urine increase was statistically significant when compared with calcium excretion at the study beginning. Conclusion: The regular intake of carbonated beverage (Pepsi®) increase calcium excretion. Thus, it may be advisable to increase the intake of milk or other dairy product to overcome the adverse impact of carbonated beverages. © 2022, University of Defence, Faculty of Military Health Sciences. All rights reserved.
... Notably, the number of T2DM patients is 8 times more than the T1DM [4], hence T2DM complicated with OP required more attentions. The controversial BMD of T2DM patients might be related to the differences in glycemic control, drug use, and body mass indices (BMI) [21][22][23]. What's more, the obesity could suppress the osteogenic differentiation ability of both adipose-and bone marrow-derived MSCs [24,25]. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background Osteoporosis (OP) patients complicated with type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has a higher fracture risk than the non-diabetic patients, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from T2DM patients also show a weaker osteogenic potent. The present study aimed to provide a gene expression profile in MSCs from diabetic OP and investigated the potential mechanism. Methods The bone-derived MSC (BMSC) was isolated from OP patients complicated with or without T2DM (CON-BMSC, T2DM-BMSC). Osteogenic differentiation was evaluated by qPCR analysis of the expression levels of osteogenic markers, ALP activity and mineralization level. The differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in T2DM-BMSC was identified by RNA-sequence, and the biological roles of DEGs was annotated by bioinformatics analyses. The role of silencing the transcription factor (TF), Forkhead box Q1 (FOXQ1), on the osteogenic differentiation of BMSC was also investigated. Results T2DM-BMSC showed a significantly reduced osteogenic potent compare to the CON-BMSC. A total of 448 DEGs was screened in T2DM-BMSC, and bioinformatics analyses showed that many TFs and the target genes were enriched in various OP- and diabetes-related biological processes and pathways. FOXQ1 had the highest verified fold change (abs) among the top 8 TFs, and silence of FOXQ1 inhibited the osteogenic differentiation of CON-BMSC. Conclusions Our study provided a comprehensive gene expression profile of BMSC in diabetic OP, and found that downregulated FOXQ1 was responsible for the reduced osteogenic potent of T2DM-BSMC. This is of great importance for the special mechanism researches and the treatment of diabetic OP.
... The mechanism of fructose affecting bone metabolism is a complex process and has not been fully explored. Some reports showed it can be through disturbing the absorption, reabsorption, and excretion of essential vitamins and minerals for healthy bone growth (Ma and Jones, 2004;Tian and Yu, 2017). Fructose could affect vitamin D metabolism and reduce vitamin D-dependent calcium transport in the rodent gut (Douard et al., 2014). ...
Article
Full-text available
Excessive fructose intake from desserts and beverages may influence bone development among adolescents. The gut microbiota (GM) and energy metabolism play important roles in bone development. In this study, 40 female adolescent rats were randomly assigned to the control group, the fructose group with two concentrations, and the glucose group as the positive control group. After 10 weeks, serum glucose and lipids were detected by means of an automatic analyzer, and the bone microstructure was analyzed by Micro-CT. Then, the GM was determined via 16S rRNA sequencing analysis, and energy metabolism was detected by measuring serum carbohydrate metabolites. At last, bone metabolism markers were measured via ELISA kits. The results showed that excessive fructose intake could increase body weight and influence the glucolipid metabolism of female adolescent rats. Meanwhile, the bone microstructures were impaired with excessive fructose intake. Mechanistically, excessive fructose intake shifted the GM of rats with the decrease of Lachnospiraceae, Ruminococcaceae, and increase of Allobaculum, Lachnospiraceae. Energy metabolism analysis suggested that most metabolites of fructose did not enter the tricarboxylic acid cycle to provide energy for the body’s development. Furthermore, serum bone metabolism markers showed that excessive fructose intake could decrease both bone formation and resorption. Our results suggested that excessive fructose intake could inhibit skeletal development in adolescents. One potential mechanism might be that it affected the intestinal microbiota homeostasis in the juvenile body, thus changing the energy metabolism level, and ultimately affecting the bone metabolic balance.
... Also, the results of this study show that unhealthy patterns are the third effective factor in Radius which is regarding the study of Li Tian et al. (45) who also found that high-fat, high-sugar diets are associated with decreased bone mass, along with an increased risk of fracture development. ...
Article
Introduction Bone indexes including trabecular bone score (TBS) and bone mineral density (BMD) have been shown to be associated with wide spectrum of variables including physical activity, vitamin D, liver enzymes, biochemical measurements, mental and sleep disorders, and quality of life. Here we aimed to determine the most important factors related to TBS and BMD in SUVINA dataset Methods Data were extracted from the Survey of Ultraviolet Intake by Nutritional Approach (SUVINA study) including all 306 subjects entered this survey. All the available parameters in the SUVINA database were included the analysis. XGBoost modeler software was used to define the most important features associated with bone indexes including TBS and BMD in various sites Results Applying XGBoost modeling for 4 bone indexes indicated that this algorithm could identify the most important variables in relation to bone indexes with an accuracy of 92%, 93%, 90% and 90% respectively for TBS T-score, lumbar Z-score, neck of femur Z-score and Radius Z-score. Serum vitamin D, pro-oxidant-oxidant balance (PAB) and physical activity level (PAL) were the most important factors related to bone indices in different sites of the body. Conclusions Our findings indicated that XGBoost could identify the most important variables with an accuracy of >90% for TBS and BMD. The most important features associated with bone indexes were serum vitamin D, PAB and PAL.
... These was also observed in our study, as indicated by increased MDA and telomerase levels, along with increased RANKL mRNA expression in the bone. Even though previous studies demonstrated a reduction of P1NP, a bone formation marker, in both the D-gal-induced aging and obese model 42,43 , we neither observed this alteration following any kind of intervention nor at any timepoint. These contradictory results suggested that an increase in osteoclast activity was exhibited earlier than a decrease in osteoblast activity. ...
Article
Full-text available
We aimed to compare the time-course effect of D-galactose (D-gal)-induced aging, obesity, and their combined effects on bone homeostasis. Male Wistar rats were fed with either a normal diet (ND; n = 24) or a high-fat diet (HFD; n = 24) for 12 weeks. All rats were then injected with either vehicle or 150 mg/kg/day of D-gal for 4 or 8 weeks. Blood was collected to measure metabolic, aging, oxidative stress, and bone turnover parameters. Bone oxidative stress and inflammatory markers, as well as bone histomorphometry were also evaluated. Additionally, RAW 264.7 cells were incubated with either D-gal, insulin, or D-gal plus insulin to identify osteoclast differentiation capacity under the stimulation of receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand. At week 4, D-gal-induced aging significantly elevated serum malondialdehyde level and decreased trabecular thickness in ND- and HFD-fed rats, when compared to the control group. At week 8, D-gal-induced aging further elevated advanced glycation end products, increased bone inflammation and resorption, and significantly impaired bone microarchitecture in HFD-fed rats. The osteoclast number in vitro were increased in the D-gal, insulin, and combined groups to a similar extent. These findings suggest that aging aggravates bone dyshomeostasis in the obese condition in a time-dependent manner.
... Fat and bone have a very complex relationship with each other, and this correlation is widely reflected in both systematic and local aspects. Local effect is mainly reflected in the change of the bone marrow microenvironment and the expression of fat with other bone cells (36). In vitro, under the pro-inflammatory stimulation of TNF-a and IFN-g, bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were activated and the metabolism of PE, PS, and lysoPC was affected (37). ...
Article
Full-text available
PurposeAs an important public health problem, osteoporosis (OP) in China is also in an upward trend year by year. As a standard method for diagnosing OP, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) cannot analyze the pathological process but only see the results. It is difficult to evaluate the early diagnosis of OP. Our study was carried out through a serum metabolomic study of OP in Chinese postmenopausal women on untargeted gas chromatography (GC)/liquid chromatography (LC)–mass spectrometry (MS) to find possible diagnostic markers.Materials and Methods50 Chinese postmenopausal women with osteoporosis and 50 age-matched women were selected as normal controls. We first used untargeted GC/LC-MS to analyze the serum of these participants and then combined it with a large number of multivariate statistical analyses to analyze the data. Finally, based on a multidimensional analysis of the metabolites, the most critical metabolites were considered to be biomarkers of OP in postmenopausal women. Further, biomarkers identified relevant metabolic pathways, followed by a map of metabolic pathways found in the database.ResultsWe found that there may be metabolic pathway disorders like glucose metabolism, lipid metabolism, and amino acid metabolism in postmenopausal women with OP. 18 differential metabolites are considered to be potential biomarkers of OP in postmenopausal women which are a major factor in metabolism and bone physiological function.Conclusion These findings can be applied to clinical work through further validation studies. It also shows that metabonomic analysis has great potential in the application of early diagnosis and recurrence monitoring in postmenopausal OP women.
... Given the feasibility of dietary changes, osteoporosis can be prevented by understanding dietary choices that affect bone health. Sugar intake is one of the dietary factors that may affect bone development as there has been an increasing number of studies showing that regular excessive intake of sugary foods negatively affects bone health (mass, morphology, microstructure, and mineralization of bone) (3). ...
Article
Full-text available
Here, we explored the correlation between gut microbiota and bone health and the effects of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) on both. Sixteen 3-week-old male C57BL/6J mice were randomly divided into two groups and given purified water (control group) or 30% HFCS in water (HFCS group) for 16 weeks. The effects of HFCS were assessed via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays, histopathological assays of colon and bone, and 16S rDNA sequence analysis of gut microbiota. The serum of HFCS group mice had lower levels of bone alkaline phosphatase (BALP), bone Gla protein (BGP), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), and testosterone, and higher levels of type I collagen carboxyl-terminal telopeptide (ICTP) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) than that of the control group. HFCS caused trabecular bone damage by decreasing trabecular number and thickness and increasing trabecular separation. The HFCS group colons were shorter than the control group colons. The HFCS-fed mice showed mild, localized shedding of epithelial cells in the mucosal layer, focal lymphocytic infiltration of the lamina propria, mild submucosal edema, and loosely arranged connective tissue. The HFCS group displayed lower abundance and altered composition of gut microbiota. The abundance of Defluviitaleaceae UCG-011, Erysipelatoclostridium, Ruminococcaceae UCG-009, Lactobacillus, Blautia, and Parasutterella increased, positively correlating with BALP, BGP, IGF-1, and testosterone levels, and negatively correlating with ICTP and TRAP levels. Our study revealed a potential diet-gut microbiota-bone health axis.
... In particular, a reduction in calcium absorption started when the diet administered contained up to 28% of fat, while there was a dramatic decrease in intestinal absorption of calcium when it reached 45% of fat. As a consequence, high-fat diet consumption in animals and humans is associated with reduction of BMD and bone strength (31). Actually, adverse microstructure changes occur in the cancellous bone compartment. ...
Article
Full-text available
There is growing recognition of the role of diet and physical activity in modulating bone mineral density, bone mineral content, and remodeling, which in turn can impact bone health later in life. Adequate nutrient composition could influence bone health and help to maximize peak bone mass. Therefore, children’s nutrition may have lifelong consequences. Also, physical activity, adequate in volume or intensity, may have positive consequences on bone mineral content and density and may preserve bone loss in adulthood. Most of the literature that exists for children, about diet and physical activity on bone health, has been translated from studies conducted in adults. Thus, there are still many unanswered questions about what type of diet and physical activity may positively influence skeletal development. This review focuses on bone requirements in terms of nutrients and physical activity in childhood and adolescence to promote bone health. It explores the contemporary scientific literature that analyzes the impact of diet together with the typology and timing of physical activity that could be more appropriate depending on whether they are children and adolescents to assure an optimal skeleton formation. A description of the role of parathyroid hormone (PTH) and gut hormones (gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP), glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-1, and GLP-2) as potential candidates in this interaction to promote bone health is also presented.
... The DGA recommend a limitation of added sugar to less than 10% of calories per day, contributing to a healthy dietary pattern of the public (DeSalvo et al., 2016). There was a complex relationship between sugar intake and bone health (Tian and Yu 2017). On the one hand, a high-sugar diet exerted a detrimental effect on both bone formation and resorption, leading to a decrease in bone mass and strength, which might be attributed to the impairment of mitochondrial respiration (Shi et al. 2020). ...
Article
Full-text available
Osteoporosis is a public health concern and a cause of bone loss, increased risk of skeletal fracture, and a heavy economic burden. It is common in postmenopausal women and the elderly and is impacted by dietary factors, lifestyle and some secondary factors. Although many drugs are available for the treatment of osteoporosis, these therapies are accompanied by subsequent side effects. Hence, dietary interventions are highly important to prevent osteoporosis. This review was aimed to provide a comprehensive understanding of the roles of dietary nutrients derived from natural foods and of common dietary patterns in the regulation of osteoporosis. Nutrients from daily diets, such as unsaturated fatty acids, proteins, minerals, peptides, phytoestrogens, and prebiotics, can regulate bone metabolism and reverse bone loss. Meanwhile, these nutrients generally existed in food groups and certain dietary patterns also play critical roles in skeletal health. Appropriate dietary interventions (nutrients and dietary patterns) could be primary and effective strategies to prevent and treat osteoporosis across the lifespan for the consumers and food enterprises.
... A few animal studies have shown that a high fat diet, especially one with saturated fatty acids, results in a stimulation of bone resorption and affects the osteoblastogenesis [15,16]. Other studies have inconsistent findings on the association of fat intake and bone maturation [17][18][19]. ...
... Other studies have inconsistent findings on the association of fat intake and bone maturation [17][18][19]. The effects of a high carbohydrate diet in animal studies and protein intake in adult studies on bone health have shown conflicting results [16,20,21]. ...
... This study reveals a positive association of fat intake (g kg −1 day −1 ) in the first four weeks of life on both BMC and BMD at TCA. The relation of fat intake on bone health has been reviewed in mice studies [16]. These mice studies have shown conflicting results on the effect of fat intake on bone health, describing both beneficial and harmful effects of high fat diets [15][16][17]19]. ...
Article
Full-text available
Aim: to evaluate the potential association of macronutrient intake in the first postnatal weeks on bone mineral content (BMC) and bone mineral density (BMD) in extremely and very preterm infants. Methods: fifty-eight extremely and very preterm infants were included. Daily macronutrient intake was calculated in g kg-1 day-1 from birth up to 36 weeks postmenstrual age. A dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry whole body scan was used to assess BMC and BMD in preterm infants at term corrected age (TCA) and six months corrected age (CA). Results: fat intake (g kg-1 day-1) in the first four postnatal weeks was positively associated with BMC and BMD at TCA. At six months CA, protein and fat intake (g kg-1 day-1) in the first weeks of life were both individual predictors for BMD. Fat intake (g kg-1 day-1) in the first four postnatal weeks was significantly associated with BMC at six months CA. Conclusion: the association of macronutrient intake in the first postnatal weeks on BMC or BMD, at TCA and six months CA, suggest that early nutritional intervention immediately after birth and during early infancy is important for bone health in the first months of life.