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Frequency of use (n = 49).

Frequency of use (n = 49).

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Conference Paper
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Voice user interfaces (VUIs) or voice assistants (VAs) such as Google Home or Google Assistant (Google), Cortana (Mircosoft), Siri (Apple) or Alexa (Amazon) are highly available in the consumer sector and present a smart home trend. Still, the acceptance seems to be culture-dependent, while the syntax of communication poses a challenge. So, there a...

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... group? Figure 2 shows the frequency of use, from which two user groups can be derived. The intensive users (n = 30, 61.2%) have a usage time of several times a day to several times a week while the occasional users (n = 19, 38.8%) have approximately weekly to approximately monthly usage time. ...
Context 2
... Target Group? Figure 2 shows the frequency of use, from which two user groups can be derived. The intensive users (n = 30, 61.2%) have a usage time of several times a day to several times a week while the occasional users (n = 19, 38.8%) have approximately weekly to approximately monthly usage time. ...
Context 3
... Target Group? Figure 2 shows the frequency of use, from which two user groups can be derived. The intensive users (n = 30, 61.2%) have a usage time of several times a day to several times a week while the occasional users (n = 19, 38.8%) have approximately weekly to approximately monthly usage time. ...

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Citations

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... • Example: Privacy has to be enhanced. (Klein, A. M., Hinderks, A., Rauschenberger, M., & Thomaschewski, J., 2020a) • Example: Privacy comparing Germany and Spain (Klein, A. M., Rauschenberger, M., Thomaschewski, J., and (Hassenzahl & Tractinsky 2006). ...
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