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Frequency of Social Contact with Faculty

Frequency of Social Contact with Faculty

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Article
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Research has shown that honors programs often provide active networks of students that contribute to the development of the students’ talents (De Boer & van Eijl; van Eijl, Pilot & Wolfensberger). These contact networks are also described as “learning communities” (Wilson et al.) and “honors communities” (van Eijl, Pilot & Wolfensberger). Such comm...

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... honors program office reports to the office of the provost of Campus Monterrey, as shown in Figure 1, and the provost reports directly to the pres- ident of the campus. ...
Context 2
... authors counted the number of such honors programs in each specified time division from 1985 up to 2004. The results of four different data sets are shown in Figure 1 together with the approximate regression line. Table 2 shows the number of honors programs arranged by discipline, showing that "science" courses comprise over 66% while "humanities" courses comprise fewer than 25%. ...
Context 3
... than half of the non-honours students (53%) never had social contact with faculty while only 4% often or very often do. Of the hon- ours students, 22% never had social contact with faculty, and 21% had fre- quent or very frequent social contact (see Figure 1). However, there were also differences between the two honours programmes that might relate to organizational structure. ...
Context 4
... staff members provided insights into the honors master's within the discipline of law at the University of Utrecht. Interviews with teachers revealed specific information about a representative example of Dutch hon- ors master's courses (Box 1). ...

Citations

... Background. Creating a community includes stimulating learning and development, improving social contact and well-being, and make room for students to meet professionals and stimulate the organization of activities [12]. Learning communities can have very different structures, but in general they can be defined as "groups of people engaged in intellectual interaction for the purpose of learning" [13]. ...
Chapter
Interdisciplinary projects have the potential to strengthen creative computational thinking of students and to support the development of their talents. When interdisciplinary projects and real-world problems are combined students are required to use their creativity, academical knowledge and exert interdisciplinary thinking. To develop students’ talents creating community and offer freedom of choice in their ways of working are seen as very beneficial. The Children’s Congress connects these aspects aiming at inspiring students to work with computational thinking in different subjects as well as promoting the concept of working in an interdisciplinary way. In this project teachers, university students, and students from primary or secondary school work together to develop a digital product. In this process the students slip into the role of researchers and scientist. This paper provides an overview of the pedagogical concept behind the Children’s Congress and the evaluation connected to the implementation of the three pillars of honors education. For this, different studies were conducted including interviews and questionnaires with school students, university students, and teachers participating in the project. This paper focuses on the results found in the questionnaires from the supporting university students and teachers and connects them with previous findings. It is shown that the Children’s Congress includes all pillars of honors education and that this concept was experienced as very beneficial for both school- and university students as well as for teachers. Moreover, the Children’s Congress was seen as a good opportunity to strengthen creative computational thinking and to support students in their talent development.
... In a study of Van Ginkel, Van Eijl, Pilot and Zubizarreta (2012), seven strategies were identified for the implementation of a vibrant honours community. Both teachers and students can use these strategies; the teachers are often in the best position to initiate communities even though the ultimate goal is that students own their community and develop the initiative themselves further. ...
... Ad 2) Programming challenging teamwork activities that are student-regulated The programming of challenging teamwork activities that are student-regulated focal events, as in the case of the Game Design Programme ( Van Ginkel et al., 2012) and the Physics Research Course, did enhance strong collaboration among students. Furthermore, the interaction among students and between students and faculty mentors can be improved by facilitating a personal project space, by providing a budget, and by supporting the use of social media and communications platforms. ...
... Furthermore, the interaction among students and between students and faculty mentors can be improved by facilitating a personal project space, by providing a budget, and by supporting the use of social media and communications platforms. Interdependence in producing an actual product is another strategy that promotes teamwork among students, as was demonstrated in the Honours Programme Biology ( Van Ginkel et al., 2012) where a team of students write a book. Mutual interaction was further enhanced by the use of peer feedback. ...
Article
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Seven strategies for implementing an honours community 1.Match students for the honours programme based on willingness and capabilities to cooperate 2.Shared experiences are the key issue in honours communities. 3.Facilitate student initiatives can be a powerful way to strengthen student ownership of an honours community. 4.Create of an intense period of interaction to deepen and enhance bonding within an honours community. 5.Organize a series of interactive activities during the whole programme to stimulate community. 6.Highlight the performance of a teacher/coach as a role model. 7.Involve community activities in feedback procedures and student evaluations.
... Research has shown that honors programs often involve networks of students that contribute to the development of the students' talents (Van Ginkel, et al., 2012). These networks are also described as "learning communities" (Wilson, et al., 2004) and "honors communities" (van Eijl, Pilot & Wolfensberger, 2008). ...
Book
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Pursuit of Excellence in a Networked Society: Theoretical and Practical Approaches
... Research has shown that honors programs often involve networks of students that contribute to the development of the students' talents (Van Ginkel, et al., 2012). These networks are also described as "learning communities" (Wilson, et al., 2004) and "honors communities" (van Eijl, Pilot & Wolfensberger, 2008). ...
... Research has shown that honors programs often involve networks of students that contribute to the development of the students' talents (Van Ginkel, et al., 2012). These networks are also described as "learning communities" (Wilson, et al., 2004) and "honors communities" (van Eijl, Pilot & Wolfensberger, 2008). ...
... Uit eerdere analyses van de interviews met de site visitors is een conceptoverzicht van communityfuncties opgesteld (Van Ginkel et al., 2012). Dit is als uitgangspunt gebruikt om de Nederlandse cases te analyseren. ...
Article
Full-text available
In honours programmes students and teachers often form a contact network that makes an important contribution to the development of the students. These ‘honours communities’ encourage productive interactions among students and between students, teachers and other professionals within and outside the honours programme. In the literature, little information is available about the features and functions of honours communities. These features and functions are central to this study, conducted in five honours programs at Dutch universities. The research was conducted on the basis of document analysis, interviews and surveys. Five key features have been found: a network of frequent contacts; a shared passion for excellence and challenge; a shared sense of community ownership; a culture of excellence; and a shared interaction repertoire. In addition, four additional features are found and three functions of honours communities. Finally, seven strategies for the development of honours communities are formulated.
... Het idee is dat een honourscommunity met een eigen honourscultuur bijdraagt aan cultuurverandering (zie bijvoorbeeld Siriusprogramma, 2013). Er is echter nog relatief weinig onderzoek gedaan naar de kenmerken en uitstralingseffecten van een honourscultuur (De Boer & Van Eijl 2010;Van Ginkel, Van Eijl, Pilot, & Zubizarreta, 2012). ...
... Studenten ervaren het als stimulerend om met en tussen gemotiveerde en getalenteerde medestudenten te werken. Ze versterken elkaar, ze vormen een studiegroep en ontwikkelen effectieve studiegewoonten (Van Eijl, 2007;Van Ginkel, Van Eijl, Pilot, & Zubizarreta, 2012;). Het creëren van een community waarin honoursstudenten samenwerken, elkaar feedback geven en actief leren is een van de belangrijkste pijlers van honoursonderwijs (Wolfensberger, 2012). ...
Article
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Excellentie en studiecultuur staan in het hoger onderwijsbeleid al geruime tijd hoog op de agenda. Dit artikel gaat nader in op cultuuraspecten van het onderwijs en wil een aanzet leveren voor een meer systematisch denkkader over cultuurverandering in het hoger onderwijs. Leidende vragen zijn: wat kenmerkt de cultuur van honoursstudenten, waarin verschilt deze van de reguliere studiecultuur en wat is de mogelijke invloed van honourscultuur op de reguliere studiecultuur? Om die vragen goed te kunnen beant‐ woorden, wordt eerst theorie behandeld over een aantal voorafgaande vragen: wat is cultuur, schoolcultuur en studiecultuur? Kun je cultuurverandering in het hoger onder‐ wijs tot stand brengen en excellentie stimuleren? Bevindingen uit onderzoek op basis van interviews van honoursstudenten en honoursdocenten van de Hanzehogeschool Groningen worden gepresenteerd, waarin vier elementen van honourscultuur naar voren komen. Verschillen tussen honoursstudenten en reguliere studenten komen aan de orde, alsmede de interactie tussen honoursstudenten en de omgeving buiten hun honourscommunity. Conclusies zijn dat er inderdaad sprake is van een honourscultuur die zich onderscheidt van de reguliere studiecultuur. Honoursstudenten zijn gedreven en ervaren hun honourscommunity als zeer stimulerend. Tot op zekere hoogte is er sprake van botsende culturen. De cultuur van honoursstudenten kan een stimulans zijn voor cultuurverandering, maar er zijn ook aspecten van cultuur die uitstralingseffecten kunnen belemmeren.
... In Figure 10.1, the strategies have been summarised briefly (Ginkel et al., 2012). Ensuring that there is an intensive contact period to deepen contact between students; ...
Conference Paper
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In higher education in the Netherlands, many educational programmes have been developed in recent years for 'highflyers', students who wish to achieve more and are able to achieve more than regular programmes offer them. At the beginning of the 1990s, the universities of Utrecht and Leiden started so-called honours programmes and many other institutions for higher education followed suit with similar programmes. In the last decade, numerous honours programmes have emerged, each with its own character. Some programmes focus on the characteristics of excellent professionals within a professional domain. Since the latter are relatively new, their contents, structure and pedagogical approach are undergoing a rapid development. To stimulate this development, the experience of a number of universities of applied sciences and research universities with honours programmes with a specific focus on professional excellence have been combined in this book. By providing background information and the results of scientific research, we have tried to add more depth to thinking about honours education and to make the experience acquired accessible to a larger group of interested parties. A large group of teachers in honours education have been willing to make a contribution to this book as authors. This has resulted in diverse examples with a wide variety of aspects of honours programmes which focus on the development of professional excellence.
... Om meer inzicht te krijgen in de kenmerken en het functioneren van honourscommunity's is hiernaar een verkennend onderzoek gedaan. Over de kenmerken van honourscommunity's is eerder gepubliceerd (Van Ginkel, Van Eijl, Pilot & Zubizarreta, 2012). Via interviews, documentanalyses en enquêtes is verder gezocht naar strategieën om 'community building' te bevorderen. ...
... Honourscommunity's blijken inderdaad netwerken van honoursstudenten te zijn, maar ook zijn honoursdocenten, coaches of experts er soms bij betrekken, in een aparte rol van bijvoorbeeld stimulator of katalysator ( Van Ginkel, Van Eijl, Pilot & Zubizarreta, 2012). Studenten hebben een passie voor het aangaan van een uitdaging en het aanpakken van nieuwe dingen. ...
Book
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Waarom een boek over onderwijsprincipes gericht op ontwikkeling van professionele excellentie? In het hoger onderwijs in Nederland zijn de laatste jaren veel onderwijsprogramma’s ontwikkeld voor ‘hoogvliegers’, studenten die meer willen en meer kunnen dan het reguliere programma hun biedt. De universiteiten van Utrecht en Leiden zijn begin jaren ‘90 gestart met zogenoemde honoursprogramma’s en andere universiteiten en hogescholen volgden met vergelijkbare programma’s. Er is in het laatste decennium een veelheid aan honoursprogramma’s ontstaan met een eigen karakter. Die programma’s zijn gericht op de kenmerken van excellente professionals in een beroepsdomein. Tal van onderwijsinstellingen werken aan de ontwikkeling van deze honoursprogramma’s, op verschillende manieren, maar vaak met groot succes. Toch weten docenten van honoursprogramma’s vaak niet hoe docenten van andere instellingen dit honoursonderwijs verzorgen. Om deze reden hebben we in dit boek de ervaringen gebundeld van een aantal hogescholen en universiteiten met honoursonderwijs, specifiek gericht op professionele excellentie. Tegelijk hebben we geprobeerd met achtergrondinformatie en resultaten van wetenschappelijk onderzoek, meer diepgang te geven aan het denken over honoursonderwijs en de opgedane ervaringen toegankelijk te maken voor een grotere groep geïnteresseerden. Een grote groep docenten in honoursonderwijs is bereid geweest om als auteur een bijdrage te leveren aan dit boek. Dat heeft ook een diversiteit opgeleverd aan voorbeelden van allerlei aspecten van honoursprogramma’s, die gericht zijn op ontwikkeling van professionele excellentie.
Article
So far, few articles about innovations in Dutch or American honors programs appear to link their findings to an existing body of research about innovations in higher education in general. Although scholars are starting to make this connection more and more (see Kallenberg; NRO, “Excellentie” and “EXChange”; NWO, “Excellentie” and “EXChange”; Jong), both parties could profit from greater contact. Scholars who study innovations in honors programs could benefit from a comparison of their findings to those in more mature fields, i.e., research about innovation in higher education. At the same time, a full model of innovation in higher education should take into account the findings about honors programs, which are natural innovation labs and thus relevant to research about higher education. Here we focus on factors that promote or block the diffusion of innovations from Dutch honors programs to other components of the Dutch higher education system. We examine three factors that emerged most frequently in a recent meeting of experts in Dutch honors programs on ‘honours education as a laboratory for educational innovation.’ This meeting was held in Leiden on 2 November 2016; jointly organized by Universiteit Leiden and Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, it attracted thirty-six stakeholders who worked in, or on, honors programs in the Netherlands as teachers, organizers, policy makers, or researchers. In discussions about factors that might promote or block the diffusion of innovations from Dutch honors programs to other places in the Dutch higher education system, these three factors were named most frequently: • the need for a safe environment in the classroom, • the need to establish communities of teachers, and • the need for institutional support. Various experts in the meeting believed that in order to be able to experiment, honors teachers need classrooms that provide safe environments in order to encourage experimentation and allow innovations to emerge. To stimulate the diffusion of resulting innovations, stakeholders believed that teacher communities and institutional support are crucial. While the meeting was held in the Netherlands and focused on Dutch honors programs, and while the setup and character of honors differ between the U.S. and Europe (see Wolfensberger, Talent Development and Wolfensberger, Eijl, et al., “Laboratories”), the issues raised at the meeting are relevant to honors education anywhere. Our discussions of the research literature about each of the three factors look beyond the current literature about honors programs as innovation labs and offer clear pathways to ideas from other fields. We also hope to stimulate reflection on the topic among researchers, teachers, organizers, and managers working in the field of honors education by offering questions they can pursue.