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Frequency and Examples of Codes for Analyzing Legitimate Peripheral Participation

Frequency and Examples of Codes for Analyzing Legitimate Peripheral Participation

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This qualitative case study used Wenger's (1998) communities of practice (CoP) framework to analyze how the ongoing electronic learning community (eLC) process at an established state virtual high school (SVHS) supported online teachers in building relationships with online students. Lave and Wenger's (1991) concept of legitimate peripheral partici...

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... fol- lowing aspects of LPP within communities of practice were used as codes to facilitate data analysis in this case study: becoming, access, transparency, conferring legitimacy, talking about practice, and talking within practice. Table 4 includes frequencies and examples of each code related to LPP. Conferring legitimacy New eLC members received positive feedback from in- structional leaders in weekly reflections and synchronous meetings 12 ...

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