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Framework of an Unstructured Supplementary Service Data (USSD) system. GMS, Global System for Mobile.  

Framework of an Unstructured Supplementary Service Data (USSD) system. GMS, Global System for Mobile.  

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The objective of this study was to develop a medical information query system based on Unstructured Supplementary Service Data. Several wireless data transmission modes of Global Systems for Mobile networks are discussed and each mode is analyzed in detail. The framework and configuration of the system is described, and functions of main system mod...

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... A number of adolescents in the study also indicated their devices did not have the space to install new phone apps. USSD technology has already been used in a number of settings to provide and support healthcare interventions (Barjis et al., 2013;Osae-Larbi, 2016;Wang et al., 2008) and to provide public health information in resource-limited settings (Amoakoh et al., 2019). The technology enables a user to access an interactive user interface that is simple, user-driven and user-friendly. ...
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Purpose The prevalence of pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections among adolescents in low and middle-income countries leads us to believe that sexual and reproductive health (SRH) information needs are still unmet. This paper investigates current sources and their limitations and then explores the role technology could play. Methods: In an exploratory qualitative study themes identified; (1) preferred sources of SRH information; (2) their limitations; (3) the role of technology in meeting their needs. Results: Mobile phone-based apps could improve awareness and provide information in a confidential way. Conclusions: Adolescents have an unmet need that vary by age and gender. Mobile phones could offer accessible, user-friendly platform.
... smartphone or nonsmartphone). USSD creates an open connection between the user's device and a network or server, allowing the user to navigate through a decision tree by inputting numbers that correspond to desired actions [28]. The workflow of a USSD-based system resembles interactive voice response systems commonly used in North America; however, the lists of options are presented to the user in the form of text rather than being spoken aloud by an automated system. ...
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Background: Digital health could serve as a low-cost means of enabling better self-care in patients living with heart failure (HF) in resource-limited settings such as Uganda. However, digital health interventions previously deployed in such settings have been unsuccessful due to a lack of local patient and clinician engagement in the design process. Objective: To engage Ugandan HF patients and clinicians regarding their experiences with HF management and technology, so as to inform the future design of a digital health intervention for HF patients in Uganda. Methods: The study employed a convergent parallel mixed-methods design. Data collection was completed at the Uganda Heart Institute in Kampala, Uganda. Data were ascertained through a patient survey and semi-structured interviews completed with HF patients, caregivers, physicians, and nurses. A conventional content analysis approach was used to qualitatively examine interview transcripts. Findings: Survey data were collected from 101 HF patients (62 female/39 male, aged 54.2 ± 17.5 years). Nearly half (48%) disagreed that they knew what to do in response to changes in their HF symptoms. Almost all patients (98%) had access to a mobile device. Many patients (63%) identified as comfortable in using mobile money - a local set of services that use Unstructured Supplementary Service Data (USSD). Interviews were completed with 19 HF patients, three caregivers, seven physicians, and three nurses. Qualitative analysis revealed four clusters of themes: overdependence of patients on the clinic, inconvenience associated with attending the clinic, inconsistent patient self-care behaviours at home, and technological abilities that favoured USSD-based services. Conclusions: Ugandan HF patients possess unmet information needs that leave them ill-equipped to care for themselves. Future digital health interventions for this population should empower patients with HF-specific information and reassurance in their self-care abilities. Based on patient preferences, such systems should harness USSD technology with which most patients are already comfortable.
... In China, a medical information query system based on USSD was suggested by Z. Wang and H. Gu to be accessed by mobile phone users within China mobile GSM network which covers 85% of all Chinese mobile phone users [31]. The system is mainly composed of a USSD service application server, a database and a USSD platform. ...
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Virtual Communities (VCs) emerged in the beginning of the 1990’s due to the proliferation of the World Wide Web. Researchers explored the potentials of virtual communities in health and created different types of Health VCs. There is growing evidence that health virtual communities can empower patients with knowledge, facilitate health information dissemination, and provide social and psychological support. Although Health VCs present several advantages, many challenges are still ahead and opportunities as well. This chapter will provide an overview of non-mobile and mobile VCs; it will then provide an overview of Health VCs research and applications as well as their advantages and challenges. The chapter ends with an outline of the main future opportunities and perspectives in Health VCs.