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Framework for Latino Health Access's Bienestar Emocional (Emotional Wellness) program describing its 3 primary initiatives, their components, and the associated timeline of related events. The program is based in Orange County, California. Abbreviations: CARES, Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act; N-20-28, executive order issued by Governor Newsom of California that allows local governments to impose temporary limitations on residential and commercial evictions under COVID-19-related financial distress.

Framework for Latino Health Access's Bienestar Emocional (Emotional Wellness) program describing its 3 primary initiatives, their components, and the associated timeline of related events. The program is based in Orange County, California. Abbreviations: CARES, Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act; N-20-28, executive order issued by Governor Newsom of California that allows local governments to impose temporary limitations on residential and commercial evictions under COVID-19-related financial distress.

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Introduction: The disproportionate impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Latino communities has resulted in greater reports of depression, anxiety, and stress. We present a community-led intervention in Latino communities that integrated social services in mental health service delivery for an equity-based response. Methods: We used tracking sheets...

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... multipronged nature of the Emotional Wellness program addresses the spectrum of needs for the community, such that 1) narrative therapy and peer support achieve culturally appropriate mental health services, 2) services to overcome barriers to care address more immediate health and social needs, and 3) community advocacy and leadership are intended to address inequities by shifting the policy environment (Figure 1). Because of the its reach and grounding in human-centered design, along with the trusted relationships promotores have with participants as program facilitators and community members facing similar circumstances, the program was the appropriate vehicle for providing integrated care once COVID-19 hit communities in early March 2020. ...
Context 2
... Emotional Wellness program adopted a population health approach to address behavioral health needs along a continuum, regardless of whether participants had a mental or emotional health condition, providing a range of services (6). As COVID-19 policies took effect ( Figure 1), the Emotional Wellness program was well-positioned to expand to help vulnerable groups meet their immediate mental health and social needs, while continuing to address the structural inequities exacerbated by the pandemic. ...
Context 3
... multipronged nature of the Emotional Wellness program addresses the spectrum of needs for the community, such that 1) narrative therapy and peer support achieve culturally appropriate mental health services, 2) services to overcome barriers to care address more immediate health and social needs, and 3) community advocacy and leadership are intended to address inequities by shifting the policy environment (Figure 1). Because of the its reach and grounding in human-centered design, along with the trusted relationships promotores have with participants as program facilitators and community members facing similar circumstances, the program was the appropriate vehicle for providing integrated care once COVID-19 hit communities in early March 2020. ...
Context 4
... Emotional Wellness program adopted a population health approach to address behavioral health needs along a continuum, regardless of whether participants had a mental or emotional health condition, providing a range of services (6). As COVID-19 policies took effect ( Figure 1), the Emotional Wellness program was well-positioned to expand to help vulnerable groups meet their immediate mental health and social needs, while continuing to address the structural inequities exacerbated by the pandemic. ...

Citations

... The impact on this group was exacerbated by uncertainty, social isolation, loss of employment and income, mortality, and social suffering. 1 Latinx youth make up one of the largest and fastest-growing ethnic minority populations of Latinx in the United-States (US) and suffer from higher rates of mental health issues than their peers. Among Latinx youth, 22% report depressive symptoms, which is higher than all other groups except Native American youth. 2 Despite this, Latinx youth are less likely to receive mental health treatment (8%) compared to their Caucasian peers (14%). ...
... 4 Despite the increased prevalence of mental health disorders among Latinx adolescents and their families, they encounter unmet mental health needs stemming from disparities in the availability, accessibility, and quality of mental health services. 1 Until we acknowledge and address these limitations of our healthcare system and the disparities in the social determinants of health, we continually fail to foster the social and emotional well-being of this vulnerable population. Consistently pursuing opportunities to tackle ingrained health injustices within our nation remains paramount. ...
... The role of peer support in behavioral health has promising outcomes, particularly when members of the community are trained in providing behavioral health services (A. Gonzalez et al., 2021;Moon, 2021;Sternberg et al., 2019). Including families in appointments, with the patient's consent, may increase the comfort level in the provider's office (O'Mahony & Clark, 2018). ...
Article
Introduction: In 2020, 18.4% of Hispanics experienced mental illness, yet only about a third received treatment compared with nearly half of non-Hispanic Whites. In Montana, where only 11% of the mental health needs are currently met, service utilization is low. The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of the Hispanic immigrant population in a rural state on mental health and professional service utilization. Methods: Using a descriptive phenomenological approach, we conducted semi-structured telephone interviews in Spanish. Audio recordings were transcribed, translated to English, and analyzed for themes. Results: We recruited a sample of 14 participants from Mexico, Ecuador, Colombia, and Venezuela ranging in age from 33 to 59. We identified five themes: definitions of mental health, maintaining mental health, familismo/socialization, stigma, and acculturation stress. Discussion: Novel findings point to the need for Spanish-language services focused on reducing stigma around mental illness and incorporating the importance of social connections.
... It has long been recognized that disparities in health care access and patient outcomes are associated with factors related to race, sex, gender, sexual orientation, primary language, and socioeconomic status (27). Epps and coauthors recognize that African Americans and other underrepresented racial and ethnic groups are often not included in health decision making and policy development (9). As a result, these public health experts describe steps undertaken to improve participation, joint decision making, and capacity building between an integrated academic health system and a community coalition to address complex health challenges with the aim of increasing the capacity of health systems to reduce the burden of COVID-19. ...
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In June 2017, Preventing Chronic Disease (PCD) invited a panel of 7 nationally recognized experts in scientific publishing to respond to key questions about the journal’s mission, quality of scientific content, scope of operations, intended audience, and future direction (1). PCD and the panel of experts recognized that chronic disease is a major contributor to poor health outcomes, an increase in health care costs, and a reduction in quality of life. Reducing the burden of chronic disease is a challenge requiring diverse collaborations and dissemination and adoption of effective interventions in multiple settings. The expert panel strongly encouraged the journal to focus more on complementing its rich body of published work on epidemiological studies with content that is attentive to evaluating population-based interventions and policies. © This publication is in the public domain and is therefore without copyright. All text from this work may be reprinted freely. Use of these materials should be properly cited.
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This review examines the current reporting trends of program design, implementation, and evaluation of training programs for Latinx community health workers. Five scholarly databases were searched using a scoping review methodology to identify articles describing training programs for Latinx community health workers. The timeframe was 2009 to 2021. We identified 273 articles, with 59 meeting inclusion criteria. Researchers thematically coded the articles to identify reporting strategies related to program design, implementation, and evaluation. Findings suggest a lack of consensus in reporting elements critical to program resources, instructor qualifications, frequency and length of training implementation, theoretical background, and pedagogical tools associated with the training program. We offer detailed reporting recommendations of community health worker training programs to support the consistent dissemination of promising practices and facilitate the initiation of new programs for Latinx community health workers.
Article
Community-initiated health interventions fill important gaps in access to health services. This study examines the effectiveness of a community-initiated health intervention to improve diabetes management in an underserved community of color using a retrospective observational study, comparing a study intervention, the Latino Health Access Diabetes Self-Management Program (LHA-DSMP), with usual care. The LHA-DSMP is a 12-session community health worker (promotor/a) intervention developed and implemented by a community-based organization in a medically underserved area. Usual care was delivered at a federally qualified health center in the same geographic area. Participants were 688 predominantly Spanish-speaking Latinx adults with type 2 diabetes. The main outcome was change in glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c]) from baseline to follow-up. At 14-week follow-up, mean (95% CI) HbA1c decrease was -1.1 (-1.3 to -0.9; P < .001) in the LHA-DSMP cohort compared with -0.3 (-0.4 to -0.2; P < .001) in the comparison cohort. Controlling for baseline differences between cohorts, the adjusted difference-in-differences value in HbA1c was -0.6 (-0.8 to -0.3; P < .001) favoring the LHA-DSMP. A community-initiated promotor/a-led educational program for diabetes self-management is associated with clinically significant improvement in blood sugar control, superior to what was observed with usual medical care.