Fractionation of mouse hippocampus yields the postsynaptic proteome. 707 A) Total lysate and postsynaptic density (PSD) enriched fractions from mouse models of autism 708 spectrum disorder (ASD) demonstrate qualitative enrichment for the synaptic marker PSD95 by Western 709 blot (4 μg each sample). B) Comparative proteomics scheme showing parallel processing of 710 hippocampal synaptic fractions from ASD mouse models and their control samples. Shank3* and 711 Cacna1c* models were only assayed in Experiment 1, and both Anks1b Het samples were assayed in 712 Experiment 2. C) Gene ontology (GO) analysis of the postsynaptic proteome in STRING (Experiment 713 1) showed enrichment for cellular components and reactome pathways (D) expected for synaptic 714 fractions. 715

Fractionation of mouse hippocampus yields the postsynaptic proteome. 707 A) Total lysate and postsynaptic density (PSD) enriched fractions from mouse models of autism 708 spectrum disorder (ASD) demonstrate qualitative enrichment for the synaptic marker PSD95 by Western 709 blot (4 μg each sample). B) Comparative proteomics scheme showing parallel processing of 710 hippocampal synaptic fractions from ASD mouse models and their control samples. Shank3* and 711 Cacna1c* models were only assayed in Experiment 1, and both Anks1b Het samples were assayed in 712 Experiment 2. C) Gene ontology (GO) analysis of the postsynaptic proteome in STRING (Experiment 713 1) showed enrichment for cellular components and reactome pathways (D) expected for synaptic 714 fractions. 715

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Impaired synaptic function is a common phenotype in animal models for autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and ASD risk genes are enriched for synaptic function. Here we leverage the availability of multiple ASD mouse models exhibiting synaptic deficits and behavioral correlates of ASD and use quantitative mass spectrometry with isobaric tandem mass tag...

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