Fraction of the cache memory used for data storage as the strength of the eavesdropper varies.

Fraction of the cache memory used for data storage as the strength of the eavesdropper varies.

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Coded caching is a promising method for solving caching problems in content-centric wireless networks. To enhance the security of coded caching for practical purposes, this paper investigates a secure coded caching scheme for defending against an eavesdropper who may possess prior knowledge before eavesdropping on content delivery. A novel key-base...

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... memory used for data and key storage in different scenarios are simulated. We first consider a case with the number of files fixed at N = 40 and the size of each cache being M = 20. The number of users is limited to {5, 10, 20}. The fraction of the cache memory used for data storage as a function of the strength α of the eavesdropper is shown in Fig. 5. We can see that the data memory usage goes to 0 as the strength of the eavesdropper increases. However, within a certain range of strength, i.e., 0 ≤ α ≤ g + 1, the whole cache memory is filled with data files. This finding shows that our proposed scheme fully utilizes the inherent weak security of coded caching. Even in the range of ...

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... In general, security in the cache can be considered from different perspectives; for example, denial of service and jamming may disrupt the cache system performance and compromise the quality of service [27][28][29][30][31][32][33][34][35]. It is also essential to provide a service of secrecy and confidentiality to protect against eavesdropping [9][10][11][12][13][14] and to ensure data integrity in the presence of attacks like content tampering [15][16][17][18][19][20]. In addition, in highly decentralized systems such as Device-to-Device (D2D) communications, it is vital to combat selfish behavior and to encourage the participation of the users in the caching process to reap the benefits of the network edge caching [21][22][23][24][25][26]. ...
... Authors in [12] have used encryption methods to maintain security. Wang et al. have proposed a coded caching method in which the central server generates random keys to encrypt the broadcast signals for defending against an eavesdropper who may know part of the cached file before the delivery phase. ...
... L and b n are respectively the content size and the backhaul capacity of SBS n, so division of them gives the duration of congestion in the backhaul link n. Therefore, the summations in (12) calculates the amount of congestion duration in backhaul links arising from transmitting non-cached contents requested by neighboring malicious users. The negative sign in the attacker's cost c 0 is to transform the maximization problem into minimization. ...
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