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For how long different age groups use the phone daily. Teenagers (12-17 years) lead in usage, with around 190 minutes. Usage decreases with increase of age.  

For how long different age groups use the phone daily. Teenagers (12-17 years) lead in usage, with around 190 minutes. Usage decreases with increase of age.  

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Conference Paper
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Smartphone usage is a hot topic in pervasive computing due to their popularity and personal aspect. We present our initial results from analyzing how individual differences, such as gender and age, affect smartphone usage. The dataset comes from a large scale longitudinal study, the Menthal project. We select a sample of 30, 677 participants, from...

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... The median age of the non-FSHD controls was approximately 13 years less than that of the patients with FSHD. Generally, the older the person, the less they tend to use their smartphone and, in particular, the less they tend to use communication and social apps [31]. When characterizing patients with FSHD and non-FSHD controls based on active smartphone use, the model may be biased because of the difference in age. ...
Article
Background Facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) is a progressive muscle dystrophy disorder leading to significant disability. Currently, FSHD symptom severity is assessed by clinical assessments such as the FSHD clinical score and the Timed Up-and-Go test. These assessments are limited in their ability to capture changes continuously and the full impact of the disease on patients’ quality of life. Real-world data related to physical activity, sleep, and social behavior could potentially provide additional insight into the impact of the disease and might be useful in assessing treatment effects on aspects that are important contributors to the functioning and well-being of patients with FSHD. Objective This study investigated the feasibility of using smartphones and wearables to capture symptoms related to FSHD based on a continuous collection of multiple features, such as the number of steps, sleep, and app use. We also identified features that can be used to differentiate between patients with FSHD and non-FSHD controls. Methods In this exploratory noninterventional study, 58 participants (n=38, 66%, patients with FSHD and n=20, 34%, non-FSHD controls) were monitored using a smartphone monitoring app for 6 weeks. On the first and last day of the study period, clinicians assessed the participants’ FSHD clinical score and Timed Up-and-Go test time. Participants installed the app on their Android smartphones, were given a smartwatch, and were instructed to measure their weight and blood pressure on a weekly basis using a scale and blood pressure monitor. The user experience and perceived burden of the app on participants’ smartphones were assessed at 6 weeks using a questionnaire. With the data collected, we sought to identify the behavioral features that were most salient in distinguishing the 2 groups (patients with FSHD and non-FSHD controls) and the optimal time window to perform the classification. Results Overall, the participants stated that the app was well tolerated, but 67% (39/58) noticed a difference in battery life using all 6 weeks of data, we classified patients with FSHD and non-FSHD controls with 93% accuracy, 100% sensitivity, and 80% specificity. We found that the optimal time window for the classification is the first day of data collection and the first week of data collection, which yielded an accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of 95.8%, 100%, and 94.4%, respectively. Features relating to smartphone acceleration, app use, location, physical activity, sleep, and call behavior were the most salient features for the classification. Conclusions Remotely monitored data collection allowed for the collection of daily activity data in patients with FSHD and non-FSHD controls for 6 weeks. We demonstrated the initial ability to detect differences in features in patients with FSHD and non-FSHD controls using smartphones and wearables, mainly based on data related to physical and social activity. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04999735; https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04999735
... Another related benefit is that digital phenotyping provides the valuable opportunity to explore links between social media usage and psychiatric illness across the lifespan. Of note, lifespan investigations might still be hampered by lower usage levels of smartphones in older generations, although empirical work demonstrates that smartphone studies in older individuals may still be feasible [14]. This said, psychiatric illnesses are characterized by distinct developmental trajectories with adolescents exhibiting specific developmental windows of sensitivity to social media usage [15]. ...
... Although some studies indicate that there is no gender difference in the prevalence rates of smartphone addiction among university students (e.g., Chen et al., 2017), a large number of studies do point to higher smartphone usage by females (e.g., Nayak, 2018;Wolniewicz et al., 2018). Moreover, a longitudinal study with a sample of 30,677 revealed that females used their smartphones for longer than males (Andone et al., 2016). Although some work has scrutinized the important ties between procrastination, problematic smartphone use and psychological flexibility, clearly these relationships are not thoroughly investigated, particularly as it relates to gender. ...
Article
Research has revealed that problematic smartphone use is a cause of procrastination. This study investigated the predictive role of problematic smartphone use on procrastination with consideration of the mediating effect of psychological flexibility. The moderating role of gender in the frequency of checking smartphones was also tested in this mediational model. Of total, 471 undergraduate students (369 female, 102 male) with a mean age of 20.65 participated in the study. The study was conducted face to face in classroom settings, and the results of the analysis revealed that psychological flexibility indeed affected the relationship between problematic smart phone use and procrastination. In addition, moderated mediation analysis suggested that female university students were significantly impacted. Finally, it was observed that psychological flexibility played a significant role amongst the female university students surveyed in the relationship between problematic smart phone use and procrastination.
... Since text messages can be sent in an anonymous manner, this may help to minimise stigma and barriers to accessing health care [54], that are particularly evident in geographically isolated underserved populations [55]. With increasing global uptake of smartphones [47], particularly amongst younger adults [56], supportive interventions using text messaging platforms are likely to be ideally suited for the endometriosis population (i.e., typical mean age 30 years [11]); yet to date no known text message intervention has been developed for this population. ...
Preprint
Full-text available
BACKGROUND Background: Endometriosis, affecting 1 in 10 people assigned female at birth, is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease, with high symptom burden and adverse socio-emotional impacts. There is a need for an accessible, cost-effective and low burden intervention to support individuals in managing their endometriosis condition. OBJECTIVE To co-design and evaluate the acceptability, readability and quality of a bank of supportive text messages (EndoText) for individuals with endometriosis. METHODS In Phase 1 of this mixed method design, 17 consumer representatives (individuals with endometriosis) participated across three x 3-hour online (Zoom) focus groups. Transcripts were encoded and analysed thematically. In Phase 2, consumer representatives (n = 14) and healthcare professionals (n=9) were then invited to provide feedback on the acceptability, readability and appropriateness of the developed text messages in an online survey. All participants completed a background survey assessing sociodemographic and medical factors prior to participation. RESULTS Consumer representatives demonstrated diverse sociodemographic characteristics (Mage = 33.29), varying in location (metropolitan vs. rural/regional), employment, relationship and education status. Participants agreed on a frequency of four text messages per week, delivered randomly throughout the week and in one direction (i.e., no reply), with customisation for the time of day and use of personal names. There were seven main areas with which individuals required assistance and became the main topic areas for the developed text messages: general endometriosis information; physical health; emotional health; social support; looking after and caring for your body, patient empowerment and interpersonal issues. Via an online survey, 371 co-designed text messages were highly rated by consumers and healthcare professionals as clear, useful and appropriate for individuals with endometriosis. Further, readability indices (Flesch-Kincaid scale) indicated the text messages were accessible to individuals with a minimum of 7th grade high education. CONCLUSIONS Based on the needs and preferences of a diverse consumer representative group, we co-designed EndoText, a supportive text message program for individuals with endometriosis. Initial evaluation of the text messages by consumer representatives and health professionals suggests high acceptability and suitability of the developed text messages. Future studies should further evaluate the acceptability and effectiveness of EndoText for a broader population of individuals with endometriosis.
... Concerning the mean total time spent on apps, the times in both periods are very similar, with 178 minutes in the periods before the 23 rd of March and 151 minutes after that date, which is in line with the mean usage times in other studies [50]. Furthermore, the top 25 applications presented in Figure 8 account for approximately 2/3 of the total usage. ...
... Additionally, due to privacy reasons, no demographic information from the users was collected, and so we do not have access to information such as age or gender of each participant in the study. It has already been proven in past studies that the use of different applications is highly correlated with users' age and even gender [50]. Making future studies with more users, and access to demographic information, may also provide new information related to the use of different types of applications. ...
Preprint
Full-text available
As the number of smart devices that surround us increases, so do the opportunities to leverage them to create socially- and context-aware systems. Smart devices can be used for better understanding human behaviour and its societal implications. As an example of a scenario in which the role of socially aware systems is crucial, consider the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. In this paper we present an innovative Humanin-The-Loop Cyber Physical system that can collect passive data from people, such as physical activity, sleep information, and discrete location, as well as collect self-reported data, and provide individualised user feedback. In this paper, we also present a three and a half months field trial implemented in Portugal. This trial was part of a larger scope project that was supported by the Portuguese National Health System, to evaluate the indicators and effects of the pandemic. Results concerning various applications usage statistics are presented, comparing the most used applications, their objective and their usage pattern in work/non-work periods. Additionally,the time-lagged cross correlation between some of the collected metrics, Covid events, and media news, are explored. This type of applications can be used not only in the context of Covid but also in future pandemics, to assist individuals in self-regulation of their contagion risk, based on personalized information, while also function as a means for raising self-awareness of risks related to psychological wellbeing.
... Hong Kong OAs have similar use patterns as in other regions [72,73]. The most frequently used apps included basic functions, instant communication, and information apps. ...
Article
Full-text available
Existing literature on the associations between use of mobile applications (i.e., mobile apps) and loneliness among older adults (OAs) has been mainly conducted before the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. Since mobile apps have been increasingly used by OAs during the pandemic, subsequent effects on social and emotional loneliness need updated investigation. This paper examines the relationship between mobile app use and loneliness among Hong Kong’s OAs during the pandemic. In our research, 364 OAs with current use experience of mobile apps were interviewed through a questionnaire survey conducted during July and August 2021, which assessed the use frequency and duration of 14 mobile app types and levels of emotional and social loneliness. The survey illustrated communication (e.g., WhatsApp) and information apps were the most commonly used. Emotional loneliness was associated with the use of video entertainment (frequency and duration), instant communication (duration), and information apps (duration). Association between video entertainment apps’ use and emotional loneliness was stronger among older and less educated OAs. Our findings highlight the distinctive relationships between different types of apps and loneliness among Hong Kong’s OAs during the pandemic, which warrant further exploration via research into post-pandemic patterns and comparative studies in other regions.
... Related to this is the fact that self-report may differ from actual smartphone usage (e.g., smartphone users may over-estimate how long they actually spent on their smartphones). For instance, Andone et al. (2016) reported among a large sample of over 30,600 smartphone users that they spent an average of 166 min a day on their smartphone. Future studies should therefore investigate using representative samples as well as using objective and standardized methods (such as actual account data, i.e., smartphone app monitoring) to provide a more comprehensive understanding to problematic smartphone use. ...
Article
Full-text available
The Smartphone Addiction Scale (SAS) is one of commonly used measurement tools to assess smartphone addiction. However, studies concerning the psychometric properties, invariance, and network structure of the SAS as well as profiles of smartphone addiction are rare in China. Therefore, the psychometric properties of the SAS, its invariance and network structure, and a latent profile analysis were investigated among Chinese university students in the present study. A sample of 2531 participants from Chinese universities (1003 males [39.6%], mean age = 20.4 years [SD = 1.3 years]) completed the Smart-phone Addiction Scale (SAS), the Internet Addiction Diagnostic Questionnaire (IADQ), and the Problematic Cellular Phone Use Questionnaire (PCPU-Q). A total of 17 items were selected from the original SAS using item analysis and exploratory factor analysis. Psy-chometric properties and measurement invariance showed good validity and reliability for the revised Chinese Smartphone Addiction Scale (SAS-RC). In item-level and facet-level networks, "withdrawal" and "daily-life disturbance" had the stronger edge intensity. There were no significant differences in either network structure or global strength between males and females through the item-level and facet-level network comparison tests (NCTs). Three profiles of smartphone use (normal smartphone use, high-risk smartphone use, and smart-phone addiction) were identified among Chinese university students. The SAS-RC demonstrates good psychometric properties and invariance and is suitable to use among Chinese university students. "Withdrawal" (i.e., psychological dependence) and "daily-life distur-bance" appear to play contributory roles as core symptom of smartphone addiction. The three profiles also provide new insight into smartphone use and addiction among Chinese university students.
... to certain familiar functionalities such as communication. For example, using a smartphone as a classic phone or just for getting information [16]. ...
Preprint
BACKGROUND Digital technologies supports everyday living, wellbeing, advanced and dignified care, and ageing at home. However, the digital divide between ages excludes older people (65 years and above) from these benefits. This divide is a proxy reflection of existing social, cultural, and economic inequalities. The 2021 United Nations (UN) international day of older person underscored equal digital opportunities, access, and meaningful participation for older people with the theme “digital equity for all ages”. OBJECTIVE In this scoping review we aim to a) identify the extent and breadth of existing literature of older people perspective on digital engagement; and b) summarize the barriers and facilitators for technological non-use, initial adoption and sustained digital technology engagement. METHODS We used the Arksey and O’Malley framework for scoping reviews. A combination of search strategy was developed based on Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) guideline - participant, content, and context. We searched for published primary studies on the major electronic databases including MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Web of Sciences, LISTA, and Association of Computing Machinery (ACM). We conducted a two staged screening (title/abstract and full article) and charted studies that fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The characteristics of the study, types of digital technology under investigation and digital engagement level were analysed using a descriptive analysis. We synthesised the findings from the primary studies qualitatively using the capability, opportunity, and motivation behavioural model (COM-B) and theoretical domain framework (TDF), a structured, systematic, and replicable a priori framework, to ground the barriers to and facilitators of older people digital engagement. RESULTS 96 articles were found eligible for the final charting and analysis. Most of the articles (63.5%) were published over the past five years (2016 onward). Majority of the studies (57/96) investigated the initial adoption stage of the digital engagement, and 54/96 studies were on everyday technology. Information and communication technologies, fall detection devices and remote monitoring technology were the most investigated technologies. Environmental context and resources were the most cited (37 times) barriers and facilitators followed by beliefs about capabilities (29/96) and physical and cognitive related capabilities (26/96). CONCLUSIONS Older people's digital engagement can be conceptualised in a three-staged continuum (non-use, initial adoption and sustained use). Affordable, usable and useful digital technologies, which address the changes and capability requirements of older people and co-created with a value framework, are among the drivers of better engagement. In addition, knowledge and skills to cope with digital technology were important factors. Tailored and comprehensive intervention addressing older people's capabilities, motivation and opportunities is vital in rendering older people digital participation. There is a research gap concerning the barriers and facilitators of older people's technological non-use and sustained digital engagement. Future research and developers may need to look into this process. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT RR2-10.2196/25616
... The Pharma Innovation Journal https://www.thepharmajournal.com purpose and additionally for information gathering process (Andone et al., 2016) [1] . ...
... The Pharma Innovation Journal https://www.thepharmajournal.com purpose and additionally for information gathering process (Andone et al., 2016) [1] . ...
Article
Full-text available
Mobile phones being the key components of the user's life have made life much easier. They are considered to be one of the most significant devices available that tends to make a huge difference in our day to day activity. Moreover, users prefer mobile phones due to many governing factors like portability, compactness, cost effective, user friendly, user satisfaction and much more. Additionally, mobile phones have become the center of attraction for the upcoming generation and the mobile phone seems to serve our communication needs better than any other communication technologies available in the market. Further, mobile phone usage provides us with a wealth of information just at the tip of our finger and our kin are found to be just a click away from us. Connecting to acquaint has become much simple and quick by the virtue of mobile phones. This study aims to understand the relationship between demographic characteristics of students and mobile use pattern as well as to understand the effect of mobile phone use pattern on interpersonal communicationamong students. The results show that mobile phone use pattern is completely a personal choice of the user and mobile phone use pattern shows significant association with gender and age, whereas, educational level is seen to have little or no influence on the mobile use pattern. Furthermore, significant impact of mobile phone on interpersonal communication of the student has been found in the study.
... In addition, it is possible to verify that the few Brazilian studies on the theme have been concentrated mainly in the Southeast region, which highlights the need to investigate the phenomenon in different socioeconomic and cultural contexts, considering the continental dimension of the Brazilian territory. Accordingly, based on what was previously highlighted, the following working hypotheses were elaborated: a) nomophobia factors will be positively associated with smartphone dependence (Durak, 2018; Yang, Lin, Huang, & Chang, 2018); b) women will present higher levels of nomophobia and dependence on the smartphone compared to men (Andone et al., 2016;Yang et al., 2018) and; c) younger people will have higher levels of nomophobia and smartphone dependence (Daei et al., 2019;Dias et al., 2019;León-Mejía et al., 2020). ...
... Despite these results, there is still no consensus in the literature, as some studies have indicated the prevalence of nomophobia among women, with them using smartphones excessively and sex significantly predicting nomophobia (Andone et al., 2016;Yang et al., 2018), while others indicate a higher prevalence among men (Daei et al., 2019), or that there are no differences due to sex (Khilnani et al., 2019), the latter corroborating the results of the present study. Accordingly, the findings reported here require further study to better explain the effects of sex on the variables in question, as emphasized by Güzeller and Cosguner (2012). ...
... According to Argumosa-Villar, Boada-Grau and Vigil-Colet (2017), nomophobia is more frequent in adolescents than in other age groups, as this group uses the smartphone more intensively to maintain their social interactions. In addition, as age advances there is an increase in the selfregulatory capacity and in the control of smartphone use (Andone et al., 2016). ...
Article
Full-text available
This study aimed to identify the extent nomophobia explains smartphone addiction, controlling for age and gender effects. Participants were 316 people from the 22 Brazilian states (Mage = 28.1 years), most from Paraíba (38.9%) and Piauí (16.5%), equally distributed between genders. They answered the Nomophobia Questionnaire, the Smartphone Addition Scale and demographic questions. The results demonstrate that the factors of the nomophobia measure explained smartphone addiction, indicating that more nomophobic behavior equates to increased smartphone addiction, especially in the younger participants, there was no difference regarding gender. These findings are discussed according to the literature on adherence to new technologies, revealing the current problem of smartphone addiction in young people.