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Food and nutrition face of the Iberoamerican Nutrition Foundation (FINUT) pyramid of healthy lifestyles. The images of the FINUT pyramid were previously registered as a trademark by the FINUT.

Food and nutrition face of the Iberoamerican Nutrition Foundation (FINUT) pyramid of healthy lifestyles. The images of the FINUT pyramid were previously registered as a trademark by the FINUT.

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Article
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The World Health Organization has proposed that health be promoted and protected through the development of an environment that enables sustainable actions at individual, community, national and global levels. Indeed, food-based dietary guidelines, i.e., food pyramids, have been developed in numerous countries to disseminate nutritional information...

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... this face of the tetrahedron, we show food-based guidelines and healthy eating habits as related to a sustainable environ- ment ( Fig. 1) ...
Context 2
... policies are needed to support greater avail- ability. In addition, food distribution policies to facilitate the acquisition of fruits and vegetables at lower prices by con- sumers should be considered (24,31,32). Indeed, fair pay and eating of local and seasonal products and sustainable ag- riculture and livestock are recommended (Fig. 1, left ...
Context 3
... this face of the tetrahedron, we illustrate healthy life- styles related to rest and physical activity (Fig. 2) ...
Context 4
... this face of the tetrahedron, we include the hygiene and ed- ucational habits that should contribute to healthy lifestyles (Fig. 3) ...
Context 5
... of the most important differences in the present FINUT healthy lifestyles pyramid is that in each of the 3 faces related to health, we devote 1 area to aspects related to fre- quency of consumption of different foods (Fig. 1), patterns of physical activity and rest (Fig. 2), and individual and com- munity commitments and behaviors related to hygiene in a larger sense (Fig. 3). We devote another area to social, cul- tural, and environmental aspects as they relate to sustainable development within each of the 3 pyramid faces (Figs. ...
Context 6
... of consumption of different foods (Fig. 1), patterns of physical activity and rest (Fig. 2), and individual and com- munity commitments and behaviors related to hygiene in a larger sense (Fig. 3). We devote another area to social, cul- tural, and environmental aspects as they relate to sustainable development within each of the 3 pyramid faces (Figs. ...

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The World Health Organization has proposed that health be promoted and protected through the development of an environment that enables sustainable actions at individual, community, national and global levels. Indeed, food-based dietary guidelines, i.e., food pyramids, have been developed in numerous countries to disseminate nutritional information...

Citations

... 5 It is widely known that the combination of foods consumed, known as dietary patterns, and their potential synergistic effects are important in the prevention of chronic diseases (such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease) rather than the impact of individual nutrients. [6][7][8] This has led to the development of methods that can be used to describe these dietary patterns. ...
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Background Several diet quality scores have been developed to evaluate the health benefits of individual diets such as Healthy Eating Index (HEI), Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH), and Mediterranean diet score (Med). This study aims to determine the relationship between dominant dietary health scores with the risk of atherosclerosis in Iranian adults. Methods This case-control study was conducted on 323 patients with atherosclerosis and 334 individuals without atherosclerosis as control group. Food Frequency Questionnaire was used for obtaining dietary intakes; then HEI, DASH score, and Med score was calculated. Logistic regression models were used to calculate Odds Ratios (OR) and 95% Confidence intervals (CI) between quartiles of the HEI, DASH and Med and atherosclerosis risk. Results The results showed that total scores for HEI, DASH, and Med in control group was higher than the atherosclerosis group. The results also indicated that higher adherence to HEI (OR: 0.43; CI: [0.24, 0.76], P-trend = .006), DASH (OR: 0.48; CI: [0.3, 0.78], P-trend = .003), and Mediterranean pattern (OR: 0.4; CI: [0.21, 0.76]) decreased odds ratio of atherosclerosis. Conclusion Our findings suggest that adherence to HEI, DASH, and Mediterranean diet might be associated with a lower risk of Atherosclerosis and can have a positive effect on general health and prevention of chronic diseases in people.
... The Iberoamerican Nutrition Foundation (FINUT) has designed a 3D pyramid as a new strategy to sustain and promote a healthy, active lifestyle. The three faces include (1) food-based guidelines and healthy eating habits that are environmentally sustainable; (2) recommendations for physical activity (PA), rest, education, and social and cultural issues; and (3) guidelines for education and hygiene chosen, which are intended for the general population of all ages and which serve as a guide for living an active, healthy lifestyle (Gil et al., 2014). ...
Article
Objective: This study aims to determine the role of the family in promoting an active and healthy lifestyle for children aged 3-12 years during the COVID-19 pandemic in the Qassim region in light of Saudi Arabia's Vision 2030 program. Background: This study is important in defining the role of the family in promoting an active lifestyle for children during the COVID-19 pandemic because the family is primarily responsible for promoting a healthy lifestyle for children. Method: We evaluated responses of 320 parents completing an online survey about their children's physical health during the pandemic. Results: The results showed a low level of children's physical activity and excessive use of electronic devices. Late bedtimes were evident and defined as midnight or later. As well, however, families knew the necessary information about COVID-19 and maintained the children's preventive measures. The families were aware of the child's consumption of a healthy diet. They helped the child complete studies through distance education. The families supported the child's psychological well-being and helped them develop some entertainment plans. Conclusions: Although the family plays an important role in promoting the active and healthy lifestyle of the child, there is still a need for more awareness regarding the child's practice of physical activity, healthy sleep habits, and correct use of electronic devices. Implications: Programs should be established to increase family awareness of the guidelines of the World Health Organization and the Saudi Ministry of Health regarding the child's physical activity, sleep habits, and the use of electronic devices.
... ttività motoria e nutrizione (14), due pilastri dell'evoluzione dell'essere umano, non sono usati con consapevolezza, come veri e propri farmaci naturali, ma sono diventati, sorprendentemente, un potenziale nemico dell'uomo. L'uomo moderno vive in un ambiente che ha esplicitamente progettato e disegnato per eliminare il lavoro fisico quanto più possibile. ...
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Over the past three centuries, the effects of humans on the global environment have increased. It seems appropriate to assign the term “Anthropocene” to the current geological epoch, which is in many ways dominated by humans. The Anthropocene can be said to have begun in the latter part of the 18th century, when analyses of air trapped in polar ice showed the beginning of the rise in global concentrations of carbon dioxide and methane. This date also coincides with the design of the steam engine by James Watt in 1784. In particular, the 21st century witnessed an unforeseen but predictable resurgence of infectious diseases, not least the COVID-19 pandemic, which had a devastating impact on lives and livelihoods worldwide. The 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus outbreak, the 2009 swine flu pandemic, the 2012 Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus outbreak, and the 2013-2016 Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa all caused significant morbidity and mortality as they spread through the global village across borders to infect people in multiple countries. In the last 70 years, the speed at which human habits have changed through technological, demographic and climatic changes is unprecedented: airline flights have doubled since 2000, more people live in urban than rural areas since 2007, climate change poses a growing threat to society, and humans have stopped following the high road shown by nature with proper nutrition and regular exercise. In this review, we consider the extent to which these recent global changes have increased the risk of infectious disease outbreaks, even though improved sanitation and access to health care have led to significant progress worldwide.
... In view of this scenario, the need for recommendations that address the issue of current production and consumption is evident, encompassing the relationship between diet, health, environment, and society [8,22,23]. Feeding is a complex phenomenon, not having the sole purpose of providing nutrients [3]. Incorporating sustainability issues into the recommendations for healthy eating has been identified as a key to nutrition policies [8,22]. ...
... Feeding is a complex phenomenon, not having the sole purpose of providing nutrients [3]. Incorporating sustainability issues into the recommendations for healthy eating has been identified as a key to nutrition policies [8,22]. Sustainability has different dimensions, with the environmental, social, and economic dimensions being known as the sustainability tripod [24]. ...
... Thus, it is observed that other aspects still do not seem to be well incorporated in the dietary recommendations [22]. The importance of nutritional content is recognized for the assessment and promotion of healthy eating practices, especially in view of the history of increased Chronic Noncommunicable Diseases (NCD) [32]. ...
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Objective Was analyzed the contents of the main messages of food-based dietary guidelines to promote healthy eating, identifying nutritional, symbolic, and sustainable recommendations. Methods Food-based dietary guidelines from 90 different countries were analyzed. These guidelines were selected from the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization database. For data extraction, all messages were exported to the Nvivo software and, after repeated readings, were grouped into predefined categories and corresponding dimensions based on the literature. The categories were created according to the mixed model, that is, they were created before data analysis was performed, but modified if necessary. Results Was identified 1,982 messages grouped into the following dimensions: nutritional (n=73.9%); sustainable (3.2%); symbolic (3.3%), and others (19.7%). All food-based dietary guidelines addressed nutritional aspects, and the most frequent recommendation was regarding the consumption of fats, followed by the consumption of salt and vegetables and fruits, cited by at least 75 food-based dietary guidelines. Less than half (n=40) of the food-based dietary guidelines addressed sustainable or symbolic aspects of food and 13 of the food-based dietary guidelines addressed both aspects. However, these messages represented only 6.5% of the total messages in the documents. Conclusions The recommendations for healthy eating in the food-based dietary guidelines are incipient in terms of sustainable and symbolic issues. Recommendations for adopting healthy diets need to consider the completeness of the food and its various combinations, dietary patterns, and the factors associated with their consumption, as well as the individual’s relations with food, environment, and society.
... According to recommendations by the Pyramid of Healthy Nutrition and Physical Activity (Gil et al., 2014), grains and grain-based products are most frequently recommended and consumed immediately after fruit and vegetables. They not only enrich food with indispensable, energy providing nutrients, but also with vitamins, minerals, fiber and native antioxidants, as well as other health promoting substances (Ragaee et al., 2012). ...
Article
Background. One of the requirements for proper nutrition and maintenance of good health is to supply the body, through diet, with an appropriately increased quantity of bioactive compounds. With this in mind, modern milling and baking industries keep introducing new types of products. The use of such additives as wholegrain flours and bran in baked products provided the basis for research in this paper. Materials and methods. The aim of the study was to conduct a qualitative and quantitative evaluation of marketable wheat, barley and oat grain, used as raw materials to produce dehulled kernels, ground grain, wholemeal flour and wheat flour type 550 (all-purpose or plain flour), as well as wheat bran. Additionally, analyses were performed to determine the chemical composition and contents of nutrients, selected bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity. Results. The studied raw materials in commercial cereal differ in their chemical composition. Dehulling of wheat, barley and oat grains significantly contributed to the reduction of minerals, protein and total dietary fiber (TDF) contents, except for the amount of protein in dehulled wheat and oat grains. Oat bran, in contrast to other oat products, was characterized by the highest contents of minerals, protein, TDF, and the smallest amounts of saccharides and total starch. The lowest content of minerals was recorded in wheat flour type 550. Thermal processes affect the concentration of tocochromanols in the grain, with tocotrienols being more resistant to hydrothermal treatment than tocopherols. Grain dehulling also significantly decreased the total amount of tocochromanols in relation to the original grains. Conclusion. Wheat products differ in the contents of their individual components. They are characterized by high contents of tocochromanols, phenolic compounds and water-extractable arabinoxylans, with the exception of white refined wheat flour, which is mainly a source of saccharides. In the case of barley and oat products, the analysis showed no differences between these product groups. It was also shown that dehulling of barley and oat grain causes statistically significant differences in the contents of nutrients and natural antioxidants.
... According to recommendations by the Pyramid of Healthy Nutrition and Physical Activity (Gil et al., 2014), grains and grain-based products are most frequently recommended and consumed immediately after fruit and vegetables. They not only enrich food with indispensable, energy providing nutrients, but also with vitamins, minerals, fiber and native antioxidants, as well as other health promoting substances (Ragaee et al., 2012). ...
Article
Background: One of the requirements for proper nutrition and maintenance of good health is to supply the body, through diet, with an appropriately increased quantity of bioactive compounds. With this in mind, modern milling and baking industries keep introducing new types of products. The use of such additives as wholegrain flours and bran in baked products provided the basis for research in this paper. Methods: The aim of the study was to conduct a qualitative and quantitative evaluation of marketable wheat, barley and oat grain, used as raw materials to produce dehulled kernels, ground grain, wholemeal flour and wheat flour type 550 (all-purpose or plain flour), as well as wheat bran. Additionally, analyses were performed to determine the chemical composition and contents of nutrients, selected bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity. Results: The studied raw materials in commercial cereal differ in their chemical composition. Dehulling of wheat, barley and oat grains significantly contributed to the reduction of minerals, protein and total dietary fiber (TDF) contents, except for the amount of protein in dehulled wheat and oat grains. Oat bran, in contrast to other oat products, was characterized by the highest contents of minerals, protein, TDF, and the smallest amounts of saccharides and total starch. The lowest content of minerals was recorded in wheat flour type 550. Thermal processes affect the concentration of tocochromanols in the grain, with tocotrienols being more resistant to hydrothermal treatment than tocopherols. Grain dehulling also significantly decreased the total amount of tocochromanols in relation to the original grains. Conclusions: Wheat products differ in the contents of their individual components. They are characterized by high contents of tocochromanols, phenolic compounds and water-extractable arabinoxylans, with the exception of white refined wheat flour, which is mainly a source of saccharides. In the case of barley and oat products, the analysis showed no differences between these product groups. It was also shown that dehulling of barley and oat grain causes statistically significant differences in the contents of nutrients and natural antioxidants.
... Over the last decade, two additional sets of diet and lifestyle recommendations have been released in Spain, those by the Mediterranean Diet Foundation [43] and the proposal by the Iberoamerican Nutrition Foundation (FINUT), including advice for healthy eating, physical activity, and hygiene [44]. Dietary recommendations in these two sets align with those by SENC. ...
Article
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Diet-related risk factors and physical inactivity are among the leading risk factors for disability and are responsible for a large proportion of the burden of chronic non-communicable diseases. Food-based dietary guidelines (FBDGs) are useful tools for nutrition policies and public health strategies to promote healthier eating and physical activity. In this paper, we discuss the process followed in developing the dietary guidelines for the Spanish population by the Spanish Society of Community Nutrition (SENC) and further explain the collaboration with primary healthcare practitioners as presented in the context of the NUTRIMAD 2018 international congress of SENC. From a health in all policies approach, SENC convened a group of experts in nutrition and public health to review the evidence on diet-health, nutrient intake and food consumption in the Spanish population, as well as food preparation, determinants and impact of diet on environmental sustainability. The collaborative group drafted the document and designed the graphic icon, which was then subject to a consultation process, discussion, and qualitative evaluation. Next, a collaborative group was established to plan a dissemination strategy, involving delegates from all the primary healthcare scientific societies in Spain. A product of this collaboration was the release of an attractive, easy-to-understand publication.
... I contenuti nutritivi della nostra alimentazione determinano la composizione delle nostre cellule, dei nostri tessuti, dei nostri organi e sono addirittura in grado di influenzare il nostro comportamento ed il nostro genoma. 1,2 Anche il cibo, come l'essere umano, ha subito modifiche nel tempo; tuttavia, negli ultimi 60-70 anni più che di evoluzione dobbiamo parlare di una vera e propria trasformazione. 3 L'avvento dell'industrializzazione nel campo alimentare ha portato modifiche molto profonde, mai verificatesi prima, con la creazione, per motivi di business, di alimenti trasformati, fatti cioè con ingredienti molto lontani dal prodotto naturale. ...
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We are what we eat Our physical and mental well-being are directly linked to what we eat and drink. The nutritional content of what we eat determines the composition of our cell membranes, bone marrow, blood, hormones, tissues, organs, skin, and hair. Lifestyle and nutrition of the humankind has undergone substantial changes during the last century. Additives and processed food have become the basis of our nutrition. Ingredients such as salt, sugar and fat are sometimes added to processed foods to make their flavour more appealing and to extend their shelf life. When the processed food industry discovered that these ingredients could be formulated to produce a state of satiety, pleasure, and sensory hedonia in those who consumed them, it extended their use to the “bliss point”, the point where the levels of saltiness, sweetness, and richness were perceived by the consumer as just right. Such modified foods can dysregulate the brain’s food reward system by increasing dopamine production, thus making the foods addictive. It is not easy to avoid these foods: the only way is to eat mainly fresh or only lightly processed foods (such as canned tomatoes and frozen vegetables). It is helpful to know which foods are healthy and what you can do to ensure you eat the healthiest diet you can. Combining a variety of foods, eating regular meals, including wholegrains, fibres, fruit, vegetables and “healthy fats”, and limiting the amount of sugar, salt and fat you eat are all recommended for good nutrition.
... I contenuti nutritivi della nostra alimentazione determinano la composizione delle nostre cellule, dei nostri tessuti, dei nostri organi e sono addirittura in grado di influenzare il nostro comportamento ed il nostro genoma. 1,2 Anche il cibo, come l'essere umano, ha subito modifiche nel tempo; tuttavia, negli ultimi 60-70 anni più che di evoluzione dobbiamo parlare di una vera e propria trasformazione. 3 L'avvento dell'industrializzazione nel campo alimentare ha portato modifiche molto profonde, mai verificatesi prima, con la creazione, per motivi di business, di alimenti trasformati, fatti cioè con ingredienti molto lontani dal prodotto naturale. ...
Article
Full-text available
Our physical and mental well-being are directly linked to what we eat and drink. The nutritional content of what we eat determines the composition of our cell membranes, bone marrow, blood, hormones, tissues, organs, skin, and hair. Lifestyle and nutrition of the humankind has undergone substantial changes during the last century. Additives and processed food have become the basis of our nutrition. Ingredients such as salt, sugar and fat are sometimes added to processed foods to make their flavour more appealing and to extend their shelf life. When the processed food industry discovered that these ingredients could be formulated to produce a state of satiety, pleasure, and sensory hedonia in those who consumed them, it extended their use to the “bliss point”, the point where the levels of saltiness, sweetness, and richness were perceived by the consumer as just right. Such modified foods can dysregulate the brain’s food reward system by increasing dopamine production, thus making the foods addictive. It is not easy to avoid these foods: the only way is to eat mainly fresh or only lightly processed foods (such as canned tomatoes and frozen vegetables). It is helpful to know which foods are healthy and what you can do to ensure you eat the healthiest diet you can. Combining a variety of foods, eating regular meals, including wholegrains, fibres, fruit, vegetables and “healthy fats”, and limiting the amount of sugar, salt and fat you eat are all recommended for good nutrition. (Healthy_habits)
... Physical activity and plant foods intake are within the major recommendations in graphical representations of healthy diet worldwide [201,202], as well as in the Double Pyramid Model and in the Iberoamerican Nutrition Foundation (FINUT) pyramid of healthy lifestyles [203], considering also the dietary environmental impact [204], which could have a positive influence on veterans. In this context, in veterans with mental illness lifestyle changes, such as exercise, diet, relaxation, time in nature, relationships and service to others, improve quality of life, weight loss and diastolic blood pressure [132]. ...
Article
Veterans with disability represent a big burden worldwide and often require long-term rehabilitation. Unhealthy dietary and lifestyle habits, including smoke and alcohol abuse, are common in veterans. In the context of integrative medicine approaches, the "complementary and alternative medicine" has been suggested for the management of chronic diseases. However, the potential risk of interaction between herbal products, dietary supplements and drugs must be considered in veterans. The Mediterranean diet has been suggested as a natural, non-pharmacological nutraceutical for healthy ageing. Although there is a broad consensus on the positive effect of plant foods consumption, the presence of glucosinolates, flavonoids and furanocoumarins in some plant foods and beverages must be taken into consideration owing to their potential interfering with drugs metabolism and bioavailability. Albeit seasonality could ensure the maintenance of the single dose of phytochemical below that at which adverse effects in some individuals genetically predisposed or unpleasant drug interactions in diseased subjects can occur, a personalized nutrition is recommended in veterans who are in treatment for comorbidities. Furthermore, sports practice can lead veterans with motor disabilities and mental impairments to excel in some disciplines, giving rise to the phenomenon of the Paralympics and the development of "recreational therapy". Moreover, outdoor lifestyle, through vitamin D synthesis, and conviviality, improving socialization, could account for the Mediterranean lifestyle health benefits. In this work we propose for veterans a Mediterranean Pyramid, which could be the basis for integrative medicine for veterans with disabilities, patient-centered approaches and interprofessional (including physical medicine and rehabilitation clinicians, pharmacists and nutritionists) interventions.