Flow diagram of the screened publications

Flow diagram of the screened publications

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Article
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The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review on the clinical applications where chorion membrane (CM) and amnion/chorion membrane (ACM) were used for oral tissue regeneration procedures. Selection of articles was carried out by two evaluators in Pubmed and Scopus databases, and Outcomes (PICO) method was used to select the relevant arti...

Citations

... Chorion membrane (CM) and amnion/chorion membrane (ACM) have emerged recently as the optimal choice for the GTR membrane. In addition to biocompatibility, low immunogenicity, permeability, stability, and resorbability, they also possess antifibrotic, antiinflammatory, antimutagenic characters, and pain-relieving effects [84]. Several researchers have found that CM and ACM could be applied for treatment of intra-bone and furcation defect, gingival recession, alveolar ridge preservation, maxillary sinus membrane repair, and large bone defect reconstruction, but further studies are needed to provide experimental evidence and particularly to demonstrate their role in tissue regeneration [85]. ...
... Exerting the anti-inflammatory, antifibrotic, and antimutagenic properties and pain-relieving effects Gulameabasse et al. [84] ...
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Article
Periodontitis is a dysbiotic biofilm-induced and host-mediated inflammatory disease of tooth supporting tissues that leads to progressive destruction of periodontal ligament and alveolar bone, thereby resulting in gingival recession, deep periodontal pockets, tooth mobility and exfoliation, and aesthetically and functionally compromised dentition. Due to the improved biopharmaceutical and pharmacokinetic properties and targeted and controlled drug release, nano-based drug delivery systems have emerged as a promising strategy for the treatment of periodontal defects, allowing for increased efficacy and safety in controlling local inflammation, establishing a regenerative microenvironment, and regaining bone and attachments. This review provides an overview of nano-based drug delivery systems and illustrates their practical applications, future prospects, and limitations in the field of periodontal tissue regeneration.
... 13 Non-absorbable materials such as polytetrafluoroethylene (E-PTFE) and titanium mesh have sufficient mechanical properties and barrier effects; however, they need to be removed by a second surgery, which may lead to secondary trauma to the gum. [16][17][18][19] Absorbable GBR membranes, collagen, chitosan, alginate, and synthetic biodegradable polymeric materials have been widely applied. 17,[20][21][22][23] Although they are conducive to cell adhesion and tissue healing with good biocompatibility, the lack of characterized bacteriostatic research related to clinical antibiotics for the treatment of periodontitis limits their application in repairing alveolar bone defects caused by periodontitis. ...
... [16][17][18][19] Absorbable GBR membranes, collagen, chitosan, alginate, and synthetic biodegradable polymeric materials have been widely applied. 17,[20][21][22][23] Although they are conducive to cell adhesion and tissue healing with good biocompatibility, the lack of characterized bacteriostatic research related to clinical antibiotics for the treatment of periodontitis limits their application in repairing alveolar bone defects caused by periodontitis. ...
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Article
Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease that leads to the loss of alveolar bone, among several studies focusing on reconstructing periodontal bone caused by periodontitis, guided bone regeneration (GBR) is a promising approach. In this study a serial clinically applied antibiotics loaded poly(L‐lactide‐co‐glycolide)/poly(L‐lactide‐co‐ε‐caprolactone) (PLGA/PLCA) fibrous mesh to prevent and reconstruct defective bone in periodontitis were prepared by electrospinning. Incorporation of antibiotics promoted the hydrophilicity but decreased the crystallinity of PLGA/PLCA membranes. Antibiotics could be sustained released from membranes. Metronidazole, minocycline, and doxycycline incorporated membranes could suppress Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) within 21 days in vitro. Metronidazole and minocycline incorporated membranes decreased 41% and 55.5% colony counts in rat gingival crevicular fluid in vivo. Minocycline‐loaded membrane could support the proliferation of MC3T3‐E1 cells and maintained 79% viability of human ligament fibroblasts cultured on it. And MC3T3‐E1 cells could undergo osteoblastic differentiation when cultured with pure PLGA/PLCA membrane and minocycline incorporated membrane. Then in vivo repairable effects of those antibiotics loaded membranes were evaluated in alveolar bone defected P. gingivalis infected model. The application of minocycline loaded membranes, effectively prevented the bone resorption of periodontitis caused by P. gingivalis. After been treated with minocycline incorporated membrane, volume of defected bone of maintained at about 50% level of control rats. 8 weeks post‐operation, newly regenerated bone was observed in the operative alveolar bone of the pure PLGA/PLCA membrane, metronidazole and minocycline incorporated PLGA/PLCA membrane treated groups. Minocycline/PLGA/PLCA electrospinning membrane is a promising GBR material that can be applied to guide regeneration of periodontitis‐induced alveolar bone damage.
... [18,32] According to systematic review conducted by Gulameabasse et al., the increased use of placental membranes in periodontal and oral soft tissue regenerative procedures not only provide a new biological membrane option but also an efficient alternative to current techniques. [33] Now as combined periodontal regenerative therapy has been opted in the present study, the allograft, DFDBA is also having an osteoinductive property and it should have enhanced the efficacy of both the membranes through space maintenance and preventing the collapse of the membrane onto the root surface or into the defects. ...
Article
Context: The use of human-derived amniotic barrier membranes in regenerative procedures along with allograft like demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft (DFDBA) has displayed promising outcomes. Aims: The objective of the current research was to clinically and radiographically evaluate and compare amniotic membrane (AM) and collagen membrane (CM) in combination with open flap debridement (OFD) along with DFDBA in the management of human periodontal intrabony defects. Settings and design: The present research-based study was a randomized controlled clinical trial of 6 months duration. Materials and methods: A total of twenty chronic periodontitis patients with intrabony defects were randomly divided into two groups: Group 1 treated with OFD + DFDBA + AM and Group 2 with OFD + DFDBA + CM. Clinical parameters such as plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), pocket probing depth (PPD), and relative attachment level were recorded and evaluated at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. The relative intrabony defect component level (rIBD) was recorded at baseline and after 6 months employing a millimeter X-ray grid. Statistical analysis used: For comparison of clinical parameters and radiographic parameters at various intervals unpaired t-test, repeated measures ANOVA test, and paired t-test were used. The P value was taken statistically significant when less than 0.05 (P < 0.05). Results: A statistically significant difference in PI, GI, PPD, and RAL for both the groups were found on intragroup comparison between baseline, 3 months, and 6 months (P < 0.05). On intragroup comparison, the difference in mean rIBD was statistically significant from baseline to 6 months. However, for all the clinical and radiographic parameters, no statistically significant difference was noted between both the groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions: In the treatment of intrabony defects AM being an allograft can be considered an alternative novel membrane for regenerative procedures.
... Based on Lindenmair's study (Lindenmair et al., 2010) and Eilbl's patent (Eibl and Redl, 2011), we considered hAM an innovative medication for bone repair. Meanwhile, we have accumulated extensive experience with hAM and perinatal tissues (Gindraux and Obert, 2010;Obert et al., 2012;Gindraux et al., 2013;Laurent et al., 2014a;Laurent et al., 2014b;Gindraux et al., 2017;Laurent et al., 2017;Centurione et al., 2018;Laurent et al., 2018;Bourgeois et al., 2019;Fenelon et al., 2019;Gualdi et al., 2019;Fenelon et al., 2020;Gulameabasse et al., 2020;Passaretta et al., 2020;Silini et al., 2020;Fénelon et al., 2021a;Odet et al., 2021;Fenelon et al., 2021;Etchebarne et al., 2021;Gindraux, 2021;Dubus et al., 2022a;Dubus et al., 2022b). Because the use of hAM in bone repair still requires some adaptations (Fenelon et al., 2021;Etchebarne et al., 2021), we looked for a disease that could benefit from both wound healing and bone repair as endpoints. ...
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Article
Medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ) is a complication of certain pharmacological treatments such as bisphosphonates, denosumab, and angiogenesis inhibitors. There are currently no guidelines on its management, particularly in advanced stages. The human amniotic membrane (hAM) has low immunogenicity and exerts anti-inflammatory, antifibrotic, antimicrobial, antiviral, and analgesic effects. It is a source of stem cells and growth factors promoting tissue regeneration. hAM acts as an anatomical barrier with suitable mechanical properties (permeability, stability, elasticity, flexibility, and resorbability) to prevent the proliferation of fibrous tissue and promote early neovascularization at the surgical site. In oral surgery, hAM stimulates healing and facilitates the proliferation and differentiation of epithelial cells in the oral mucosa and therefore its regeneration. We proposed using cryopreserved hAM to eight patients suffering from cancer (11 lesions) with stage 2–3 MRONJ on a compassionate use basis. A collagen sponge was added in some cases to facilitate hAM grafting. One or three hAMs were applied and one patient had a reapplication. Three patients had complete closure of the surgical site with proper epithelialization at 2 weeks, and two of them maintained it until the last follow-up. At 1 week after surgery, three patients had partial wound dehiscence with partial healing 3 months later and two patients had complete wound dehiscence. hAM reapplication led to complete healing. All patients remained asymptomatic with excellent immediate significant pain relief, no infections, and a truly positive impact on the patients’ quality of life. No adverse events occurred. At 6 months of follow-up, 80% of lesions had complete or partial wound healing (30 and 50%, respectively), while 62.5% of patients were in stage 3. Radiological evaluations found that 85.7% of patients had stable bone lesions (n = 5) or new bone formation (n = 1). One patient had a worsening MRONJ but remained asymptomatic. One patient did not attend his follow-up radiological examination. For the first time, this prospective pilot study extensively illustrates both the handling and surgical application of hAM in MRONJ, its possible association with a collagen sponge scaffold, its outcome at the site, the application of multiple hAM patches at the same time, and its reapplication.
... Gulameabasse et al. recently published a systematic review of 21 studies conducted on 375 human patients on the use of CM and amnion/chorion membrane (ACM). They found that CM and ACM are effective alternatives to current techniques in treating various oral soft-tissue defects, including gingival recession, intrabony and furcation defects, alveolar ridge preservation, keratinized tissue width augmentation around dental implants, maxillary sinus repair and large bone reconstruction [20]. However, further studies are necessary to investigate their role in bone regeneration. ...
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Article
Abstract: Guided bone and tissue regeneration remains an integral treatment modality to regenerate bone surrounding teeth and dental implants. Barrier membranes have been developed and produced commercially to allow space for bone regeneration and prevent the migration of unwanted cells. Ideal membrane properties, including biocompatibility, sufficient structural integrity and suitable shelf life with easy clinical application, are important to ensure good clinical regenerative outcomes. Membranes have various types, and their clinical application depends on the origin, material, structure and properties. This narrative review aims to describe the currently available barrier membranes in terms of history, main features, types, indication and clinical application and classify them into various groups. Various membranes, including those which are resorbable and non-resorbable, synthetic, added with growth factors and composed of modern materials, such as high-grade polymer (Polyetheretherketone), are explored in this review. Citation: Alauddin, M.S.; Abdul Hayei, N.A.; Sabarudin, M.A.; Mat Baharin, N.H. Barrier Membrane in Regenerative Therapy: A Narrative Review. Membranes 2022, 12, 444.
... Chorion and amnion-chorion membrane (ACM) products are also very popular in this indication because they provide not only better handling and thickness, but also provide intrinsic growth factors (Koob et al., 2015;McQuilling et al., 2017). Two recent systematic reviews examined hAM, chorion and ACM benefits for wound healing in various areas of oral reconstruction (Fenelon et al., 2018a;Gulameabasse et al., 2020). ...
... The aim of this review is to help practitioners better understand hAM and ACM applications in the oral cavity. The healing effectiveness of fetal membranes has been widely addressed (Fenelon et al., 2018a;Gulameabasse et al., 2020). We focused on clinical hAM/ACM implantation or use as a covering, storage format, application side, size and number, multilayered use or folding, suturing or use of additional protective covers, re-application and resorption/rate. ...
... In our literature review, we noticed that none of implanted hAM/ACM were directly sutured; in two cases the graft's stability was ensured by sutures (Hassan et al., 2017;De Angelis et al., 2019). From Gulameabasse's review, implanted ACM was sutured in four studies for stabilization, otherwise it was only applied to the surgical site (Gulameabasse et al., 2020). When hAM was used as a cover, it was sutured in place in 9 of the 11 studies; two studies did not provide enough detail (Guler et al., 1997;Samandari et al., 2004). ...
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Article
Due to its intrinsic properties, there has been growing interest in human amniotic membrane (hAM) in recent years particularly for the treatment of ocular surface disorders and for wound healing. Herein, we investigate the potential use of hAM and amnion-chorion membrane (ACM) in oral surgery. Based on our analysis of the literature, it appears that their applications are very poorly defined. There are two options: implantation or use as a cover material graft. The oral cavity is submitted to various mechanical and biological stimulations that impair membrane stability and maintenance. Thus, some devices have been combined with the graft to secure its positioning and protect it in this location. This current opinion paper addresses in detail suitable procedures for hAM and ACM utilization in soft and hard tissue reconstruction in the oral cavity. We address their implantation and/or use as a covering, storage format, application side, size and number, multilayer use or folding, suture or use of additional protective covers, re-application and resorption/fate. We gathered evidence on pre- and post-surgical care and evaluation tools. Finally, we integrated ophthalmological and wound healing practices into the collected information. This review aims to help practitioners and researchers better understand the application of hAM and ACM in the oral cavity, a place less easily accessible than ocular or cutaneous surfaces. Additionally, it could be a useful reference in the generation of new ideas for the development of innovative protective covering, suturing or handling devices in this specific indication. Finally, this overview could be considered as a position paper to guide investigators to fulfill all the identified criteria in the future.
... Multilayered hAM was used to close oronasal fistula in minipigs [161] and in four patients [83]. Moreover, the amniochorionic membranes were compared to the conventional membrane already used for GBR procedures in oral surgery [162]. ...
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Article
An important component of tissue engineering (TE) is the supporting matrix upon which cells and tissues grow, also known as the scaffold. Scaffolds must easily integrate with host tissue and provide an excellent environment for cell growth and differentiation. Human amniotic membrane (hAM) is considered as a surgical waste without ethical issue, so it is a highly abundant, cost-effective, and readily available biomaterial. It has biocompatibility, low immunogenicity, adequate mechanical properties (permeability, stability, elasticity, flexibility, resorbability), and good cell adhesion. It exerts anti-inflammatory, antifibrotic, and antimutagenic properties and pain-relieving effects. It is also a source of growth factors, cytokines, and hAM cells with stem cell properties. This important source for scaffolding material has been widely studied and used in various areas of tissue repair: corneal repair, chronic wound treatment, genital reconstruction, tendon repair, microvascular reconstruction, nerve repair, and intraoral reconstruction. Depending on the targeted application, hAM has been used as a simple scaffold or seeded with various types of cells that are able to grow and differentiate. Thus, this natural biomaterial offers a wide range of applications in TE applications. Here, we review hAM properties as a biocompatible and degradable scaffold. Its use strategies (i.e., alone or combined with cells, cell seeding) and its degradation rate are also presented.
... AM is a promising natural allogenic biomaterial which is widely available without ethical concerns. Moreover, compared to collagen or synthetic membranes commonly used for guided bone regeneration procedures, AM displays several biological properties making it very attractive for this field (Gindraux et al., 2017;Fénelon et al., 2018a;Aprile et al., 2020;Gulameabasse et al., 2020). AM promotes epithelialization, namely by excreting epithelial growth factor (EGF) (Jin et al., 2016) and has also the ability to modulate angiogenesis (Niknejad et al., 2013). ...
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Article
Thanks to their biological properties, amniotic membrane (AM), and its derivatives are considered as an attractive reservoir of stem cells and biological scaffolds for bone regenerative medicine. The objective of this systematic review was to assess the benefit of using AM and amniotic membrane-derived products for bone regeneration. An electronic search of the MEDLINE—Pubmed database and the Scopus database was carried out and the selection of articles was performed following PRISMA guidelines. This systematic review included 42 articles taking into consideration the studies in which AM, amniotic-derived epithelial cells (AECs), and amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells (AMSCs) show promising results for bone regeneration in animal models. Moreover, this review also presents some commercialized products derived from AM and discusses their application modalities. Finally, AM therapeutic benefit is highlighted in the reported clinical studies. This study is the first one to systematically review the therapeutic benefits of AM and amniotic membrane-derived products for bone defect healing. The AM is a promising alternative to the commercially available membranes used for guided bone regeneration. Additionally, AECs and AMSCs associated with an appropriate scaffold may also be ideal candidates for tissue engineering strategies applied to bone healing. Here, we summarized these findings and highlighted the relevance of these different products for bone regeneration.
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Article
Objectives: The purpose of this pilot porcine study was to explore and illustrate the surgical application of human amniotic membrane (hAM) in an ex vivo model of medication-related osteonecrosis of the jaw (MRONJ). Material and methods: Five oral and maxillofacial surgeons participated to this study. MRONJ was simulated on porcine mandible specimens. hAM was applied using four different techniques: implantation with complete coverage, implantation with partial coverage, apposition and covering graft material. At the same time, the surgeons evaluated how well the hAM handled and its physical properties during the surgery. Results: Surgeons found that hAM had suitable mechanical properties, as it was easy to detach from the support, handle, bind to the defect and bury. hAM was also found to be strong and stable. The “implantation with complete coverage” and “implantation with partial coverage” techniques were the preferred choices for the MRONJ indication. Conclusion: This study shows that hAM is a graft material with suitable properties for oral surgery. It is preferable to use it buried under the gingiva with sutures above it, which increases its stability. This technical note aims to educate surgeons and provide them with details about the handling of hAM in oral surgery. Clinical relevance: Two surgical techniques for hAM application in MRONJ were identified and illustrated. hAM handling and physical properties during surgery were reported.
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Article
Perinatal derivatives (PnD) are birth-associated tissues, such as placenta, umbilical cord, amniotic and chorionic membrane, and thereof-derived cells as well as secretomes. PnD play an increasing therapeutic role with beneficial effects on the treatment of various diseases. The aim of this review is to elucidate the modes of action of non-hematopoietic PnD on inflammation, angiogenesis and wound healing. We describe the source and type of PnD with a special focus on their effects on inflammation and immune response, on vascular function as well as on cutaneous and oral wound healing, which is a complex process that comprises hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation (including epithelialization, angiogenesis), and remodeling. We further evaluate the different in vitro assays currently used for assessing selected functional and therapeutic PnD properties. This review is a joint effort from the COST SPRINT Action (CA17116) with the intention to promote PnD into the clinics. It is part of a quadrinomial series on functional assays for validation of PnD, spanning biological functions, such as immunomodulation, anti-microbial/anti-cancer activities, anti-inflammation, wound healing, angiogenesis, and regeneration.