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Finite element model of the Lissos bridge and its eigenmodes with participating mass ratios greater

Finite element model of the Lissos bridge and its eigenmodes with participating mass ratios greater

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This paper presents a novel, bridge-dependent approach for quantifying the increase of design quantities due to spatially variable earthquake ground motion (SVEGM). Contrary to the existing methods for multiple support bridge excitation analysis that are either too complicated to be applied by most practitioners or oversimplied (e. g. Eurocode 8, A...

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... During the last decades, many researchers investigated the effect of SVEGM on the seismic responses of various types of bridges [30][31][32][33][34][35][36][37][38][39][40][41][42][43][44][45][46][47] and pointed out the significance of this phenomenon in the seismic design of bridges. Numerous methodologies, either sophisticated ( [29,[48][49][50][51][52][53][54][55][56][57][58][59] among else) or simplified with a more practical dimension [60][61][62], have been presented in the literature in order to account for the SVEGM, while suggestions to the associated code provisions have been also proposed [63][64][65]. An important observation toward a better understanding of SVEGM was demonstrated by Burdette et al. [41,42] and Sextos et al. [43], who pointed out the amplified contribution of higher modes. ...
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