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Fingers next to Canvas: the mess of data collection with my "ngers cutting into the left-hand side of the image.

Fingers next to Canvas: the mess of data collection with my "ngers cutting into the left-hand side of the image.

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This paper brings together two different ways of knowing failure, with a view to offering epistemological, methodological and ontological resources for undertaking feminist research. The idea behind ‘two ways of knowing failure’ is to make a point about the kinds of knowledge, data, and methods that are legitimate and valued in the research assembl...

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