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and 5. Images of the Unbuilt ruin Exhibit taken at the Compton Gallery at MIT. Figures 6 and 7. Visitors placing the active cursor on a hot spot on the map and discussing the displayed views.  

and 5. Images of the Unbuilt ruin Exhibit taken at the Compton Gallery at MIT. Figures 6 and 7. Visitors placing the active cursor on a hot spot on the map and discussing the displayed views.  

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We present three interactive exhibit projects which add technology to the museum space or to the museum visitor. We propose a technological intervention which helps curators and designers to achieve a balance between leisure and learning and help them be more effective in conveying story and meaning. This is made possible by tracking people and obj...

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... In order to compete with other entertainment spaces, today's museums and exhibits must take advantage of technological evolution to create a sense of immersion in the exhibit space and achieve a more effective communication between visitors, curators and authors. Several research groups are studying possible applications for state-of-the-art Human-Computer interaction paradigms in the area of museum design [6][7][8][9]. Sparacino et al [8] defined the concept of "Museum Intelligence", a set of guiding principles that can be applied to design interactive installations for exhibits, with the purpose of creating a sense of wonder, amusement and curiosity in visitors: Perceptual Intelligence. An interactive museum or exhibit space should be aware of visitors' presence so that it can interpret their utterances like movement, gestures and voice; Interpretive Intelligence. ...
... Once identified, the installations can customize the content according to each user that visits them. On the other hand, Sparacino et al [7] chose a less intrusive system that uses video cameras to track visitors and objects. However, the accuracy of video cameras is highly dependent on lights and calibration, opposing to RFID tags that work in almost every conditions. ...
... Much of the research on interactive exhibition design has focused on how technology can be created and used to enhance the visitor experience. For instance, early examples include Sparacino et al.'s explorations in using object and person tracking mechanisms to deliver digital content within interactive exhibitions [23]. ...
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... The curators also discussed the interaction modality on the interactive table. The author had previously designed two similar devices: one for the " Unbuilt Ruins " exhibit, held at the MIT Compton gallery at the beginning of 1999 [Sparacino, 1999] and one also that served as the original prototype for MOMA's " Unprivate House " exhibit, held in the summer of the same year The first interactive table used two types of selector-objects to allow visitors to select content: people in a small group could collaborate and take turns in moving the selector objects on the animated table surface. MOMA instead chose to have an interactive table with separate identical " place mats " for individual visitors: several people sat around the table and each interacted individually in his own space. ...
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... While it is not possible to design an exhibit for all these categories of visitors, it is desirable for museums to attract as many people as possible. Technology today can offer exhibit designers and curators new ways to communicate more efficiently with their public, and to personalize the visit according to people's desires and expectations [35]. ...
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... They look at technology as a possible partner which can help archive a balance between leisure and learning as well as help them be more effective in conveying story and meaning. Technology can help construct a coherent narrative of an exhibit for the visitor by creating experiences in which the objects on display narrate their own story in context [14]. Using interactive techniques embedded in the physical space museums can present a larger variety and more connected material in an engaging manner within the limited space available. ...
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