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Figure One: " Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrica " , The Bantu National Anthem, by Enoch Sontonga, original sheet music from Lovedale Sol-fa-Leaflets, No. 17, 1904.  

Figure One: " Nkosi Sikelel' iAfrica " , The Bantu National Anthem, by Enoch Sontonga, original sheet music from Lovedale Sol-fa-Leaflets, No. 17, 1904.  

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“Nkosi Sikelel’ iAfrika” (“God Bless Africa”), known as the African anthem, is a powerful signifier for mourning, redemption, and celebration. The Methodist hymnody patterns and the text of the song belie its roots in missionary cultural contact. The song also figures prominently in the ceremonial repertoire of many independent churches and has bee...

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