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Modelo de Demandas y Recursos (adaptado de Bakker y Demerouti, 2017).

Modelo de Demandas y Recursos (adaptado de Bakker y Demerouti, 2017).

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Nursing professionals who work in intensive care units and participate in activities related to organ donation and transplantation are exposed to a significant number of stressors their work, which favors the appearance of certain psychosocial risks such as work stress, burnout, secondary traumatic stress, moral stress, and the conflict between wor...

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... Health professionals were at risk of suffering from several occupational risks before the pandemic (i.e., burnout and secondary traumatic stress) (Blanco-donoso et al., 2018;Moreno-Jiménez et al., 2019), but in the face of COVID-19 encounter several further occupational hazards that may have an immediate psychological impact on well-being (Brooks et al., 2020;Luceño-Moreno et al., 2020;Zhu et al., 2020). Spain has one of the highest rates of health professionals infected by the disease, reaching 40,961 cases in May (Red Nacional de Vigilancia Epidemiológica, 2020). ...
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The current COVID-19 crisis may have an impact on the mental health of professionals working on the frontline, especially healthcare workers due to the increase of occupational psychosocial risks, such as emotional exhaustion and secondary traumatic stress (STS). This study explored job demands and resources during the COVID-19 crisis in predicting emotional exhaustion and STS among health professionals. The present study is a descriptive and correlational cross-sectional design, conducted in different hospitals and health centers in Spain. The sample consisted of 221 health professionals with direct involvement in treating COVID-19. An online survey was created and distributed nationwide from March 20 to April 15 which assessed: sociodemographic and occupational data, fear of contagion, contact with death/suffering, lack of material and human protection resources (MHRP), challenge, emotional exhaustion, and STS. Descriptive findings show high levels of workload, contact with death/suffering, lack of MHPR and challenge, and are moderately high for fear of contagion, emotional exhaustion, and STS. We found an indirect significant effect of lack of MHPR on predicting (1) emotional exhaustion through the workload and (2) on STS through fear of contagion, contact with death/suffering, and workload. To conclude, this study examines the immediate consequences of the crisis on health professionals' well-being in Spain, emphasizing the job demands related to COVID-19 that health professionals are facing, and the resources available in these health contexts. These findings may boost follow-up of this crisis among health professionals to prevent them from long-term consequences.
... The psychosocial risk factors at work are "those aspects of work design and the organization and management of work, and their social and environmental contexts, which have the potential for causing psychological, social or physical harm " ( Cox and Griffiths, 1996 ). It is well known that health professionals in emergency departments and ICUs were already exposed to intense cognitive, physical, social and emotional demands in their daily work, even before this pandemic ( Adriaenssens et al., 2015 ;Blanco-Donoso et al., 2018 ;Wang et al., 2020 ). Just remember that according to the last European Working Conditions Survey ( Eurofound 2017 ), workers in the health sector (e.g. ...