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Fig 2 - Iron and multiple sclerosis

Fig. 2. Ferric iron, Fe(III), in the diet is converted to ferrous iron, Fe(II), by a ferroreductase duodenal cytochrome b that is located on the apical surface of enterocytes of the duodenal mucosa. Fe(II) is then transported into enterocytes through the divalent metal transporter (DMT1). Fe(II) in enterocytes can be incorporated into the cytosolic iron-storage molecule ferritin or can be transported across the basolateral surface of enterocytes into the plasma by ferroportin. Fe(II) is subsequently converted to Fe(III) by a membrane-associated ferroxidase, hephaestin. Reprinted from De Domenico et al. (2008) with permission from the publisher. 
Ferric iron, Fe(III), in the diet is converted to ferrous iron, Fe(II), by a ferroreductase duodenal cytochrome b that is located on the apical surface of enterocytes of the duodenal mucosa. Fe(II) is then transported into enterocytes through the divalent metal transporter (DMT1). Fe(II) in enterocytes can be incorporated into the cytosolic iron-storage molecule ferritin or can be transported across the basolateral surface of enterocytes into the plasma by ferroportin. Fe(II) is subsequently converted to Fe(III) by a membrane-associated ferroxidase, hephaestin. Reprinted from De Domenico et al. (2008) with permission from the publisher. 
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