TABLE 2- uploaded by Ochieng Justus
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Factors influencing quantity of beans supplied to the market

Factors influencing quantity of beans supplied to the market

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... factors influencing output and marketable surplus of bean in Burundi are presented in Tables 1 and 2, respectively. ...
Context 2
... factors such as extension service provision, age of household head, labour, credit and market price did not significantly affect the quantity of beans produced. Table 2 indicates the likelihood estimates of determinants of quantity supplied to the market by small-scale farmers. The variables significantly influencing the quantity supplied in the market included transportation losses, bean price, quantity produced and quantity stored for food. ...
Context 3
... transportation losses were a major impediment to bean marketing (Table 2). The coefficient of transport losses was significant (P<0.1) and most farmers were unable to transport the desired quantity to the market due to high transport losses. ...
Context 4
... of beans produced greatly influenced the quantity marketed and the smallholder farmers who realised higher output, supplied larger proportion of their beans to the market ( Table 2). The results show that farmers, who increased their output by 1 unit, would be able to increase the quantity of marketable supply by 28%. ...

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