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Factorial analysis of the reasons to consume blueberries.

Factorial analysis of the reasons to consume blueberries.

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Article
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Aim of study: This study focuses on the preference for and consumption habits of blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) in an emerging market. The objective is to analyze the determinants of blueberry consumption in Chile and evaluate to what extent traditional factors, such as income and price, are more determinant than other attitudinal factors an...

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Context 1
... factorial analysis was performed to regroup the different reasons for consumption into a few factors. Results are shown in Table 3. Three factors were obtained that explained 58% of the variance of the original questions. ...
Context 2
... factorial analysis was performed to regroup the different reasons for consumption into a few factors. Results are shown in Table 3. Three factors were obtained that explained 58% of the variance of the original questions. ...

Citations

... Together with their taste, these characteristics have promoted blueberry consumption and thereby steadily increased market demand. World blueberry production has more than doubled, from 300 000 tons in 2008 to 657 000 tons in 2017 (Romo-Muñ oz et al., 2020). In China, production increased more than 100-fold between 2006 and 2015 and reached 234 700 tons in 2020 . ...
Article
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Vaccinium darrowii is a subtropical wild blueberry species, which was used to breed economically important southern highbush cultivars. The adaptation traits of V. darrowii to subtropical climates would provide valuable information for breeding blueberry and perhaps other plants, especially against the background of global warming. Here, we assembled the V. darrowii genome into 12 pseudochoromosomes using Oxford Nanopore long reads complemented with Hi-C scaffolding technologies, and predicted 41 815 genes using RNAseq evidence. Syntenic analysis across three Vaccinium species revealed a highly conserved genome structure, with the highest collinearity between V. darrowii and V. corymbosum. This conserved genome structure may explain the high fertility during crossbreeding between V. darrowii and other blueberry cultivars. Gene expansion and tandem duplication analysis indicated possible roles of defense and flowering associated genes in adaptation of V. darrowii to the subtropics. The possible SOC1 genes in V. darrowii were identified with phylogeny and expression analysis. Blueberries are covered in a thick cuticle layer and contains anthocyanins, which confer their powdery blue color. Using RNA-sequencing, the cuticle biosynthesis pathways of Vaccinium species were delineated here in V. darrowii. This result could serve as a reference for breeding berries with customer-desired colors. The V. darrowii reference genome, together with the unique traits of this species, including diploid genome, short vegetative phase, and high compatibility in hybridization with other blueberries, make V. darrowii a potential research model for blueberry species.
... During the last decade, new cultivars and modern agricultural practices have been adopted, resulting in consistent improvement in berry production in Italy, with 1.675 tons harvested from 172 ha in 2018 (FAOSTAT 2019). Increasing emphasis on healthy life-styles and the recognition of blueberries as natural functional food have favoured berryfruit consumption and influenced the increased world produc-tion (Polashock et al., 2017;Romo-Muñoz et al., 2019). However, this led to increased global movement and trade of plant materials, resulting in the spread of pathogens and emergence of new diseases (Polashock et al., 2017;Guarnaccia et al., 2020;Liu et al., 2020). ...
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Highbush blueberry is an increasingly important crop due to its economic value and demonstrated health benefits of blueberries. Leaf spots are considered as minor diseases of blueberry plants, but they adversely affect blueberry productivity , causing reduced photosynthetic activity, flower bud formation and berry production. Surveys of blueberry crops were conducted in Piedmont, Northern Italy, during 2019-2020. Fungi isolated from leaf spots of the blueberry cultivar 'Blue Ribbon' were identified as Colletotrichum helleniense through a robust multi-locus phylogeny. Eight genomic loci were considered: tub, gapdh, act, cal, his3, chs-1, ApMat and gs. Morphological characters of a representative strain were assessed. Pathogenicity was confirmed on four blueberry cultivars, although with different levels of aggressiveness to the cul-tivars. This study shows the importance of a polyphasic approach to investigate species of Colletotrichum, and the relevance of molecular tools for the species-level characterization within the 'Kahawae' clade. This is the first report of Colletotrichum helleniense causing leaf anthracnose on Vaccinium corymbosum.
... Together with their taste, these characteristics have promoted blueberry consumption and thereby steadily increased market demand. World blueberry production has more than doubled, from 300 000 tons in 2008 to 657 000 tons in 2017 (Romo-Muñ oz et al., 2020). In China, production increased more than 100-fold between 2006 and 2015 and reached 234 700 tons in 2020 . ...
Preprint
Full-text available
Vaccinium darrowii is a subtropical wild blueberry species, which was used to breed economically important southern highbush cultivars. The adaptation traits of V. darrowii to subtropical climate would provide valuable information for breeding blueberry and perhaps other plants, especially against the background of global warming. Here, we assembled the V. darrowii genome into 12 pseudochoromosomes using Oxford Nanopore long reads complemented with Hi-C scaffolding technologies, and predicted 41 815 genes using RNAseq evidence. Syntenic analysis across three Vaccinium species revealed a highly conserved genome structure, with the highest collinearity between V. darrowii and V. corymbosum . This conserved genome structure may explain the high fertilization during crossbreeding between V. darrowii and other blueberry cultivars. Gene expansion and tandem duplication analysis indicated possible roles of defense and flowering associated genes in adaptation of V. darrowii to the subtropics. The possible SOC1 genes in V. darrowii were identified with phylogeny and expression analysis. Blueberries are covered in a thick cuticle layer and contain anthocyanins, which confer their powdery blue color. Using RNA-sequencing, the cuticle biosynthesis pathways of Vaccinium species were delineated here in V. darrowii . This result could serve as a reference for breeding berries with customer-desired colors. The V. darrowii reference genome, together with the unique traits of this species, including diploid genome, short vegetative phase, and high compatibility in hybridization with other blueberries, make V. darrowii a potential research model for blueberry species.
... Functional food products are also widely available in stores through the manufacture of blueberry fruits and include jams, juices, beverages, dairy foods, snacks, among others (Carew et al., 2006;Corbo et al., 2014;Kim & Kwak, 2015;Romo-Muñoz et al., 2019). Depending on the processing method used (e.g., quick freezing, thermal dehydration, radiant zone drying), processing blueberries can severely affect their overall composition (Kalt et al., 2020). ...
Thesis
Blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum) is a perennial shrub, native to North America whose popularity has increasing due to its health benefits. In Portugal, this culture represents an important part of the country's economy, being cultivated in several regions. However, the fast growth of production has been accompanied by the appearance of pathogens, mainly fungi. Considering that studies carried out on pathogenic blueberry fungi in Portugal are still quite scarce, this study aimed to identify species of the genera Pestalotiopsis and Neopestalotiopsis, which are known pathogens severely affecting blueberry plantations worldwide. Therefore, a collection of 51 isolates was obtained from symptomatic blueberry plants collected in different cultivation orchards in Portugal. In order to assess the genetic diversity of our collection, all isolates were subjected to MSP-PCR fingerprinting. According to the analysis of the genetic profiles, 16 representative isolates were chosen for a molecular identification based on the sequencing and analysis of the ITS region, which allowed to identify 2 different genera: Pestalotiopsis and Neopestalotiopsis.To better discriminate the isolates at species level, a multi-locus sequence analysis was performed using, in addition to the ITS region, the protein coding genes: translation elongation factor 1-alpha (tef1-α) and beta-tubulin 2 (tub2). A phylogenetic analysis of the ITS, tef1-α and tub2 regions revealed the presence of 4 known species, placed into distinct clades (Pestalotiopsis chamaeropis, P. biciliata, P. australis and Neopestalotiopsis rosae), and 3 putative new species. These were characterized in terms of morphology and ability to grow at different temperatures and the names N. baccae, N. scalabiensis and N. vaccinii proposed. Of all the identified species, N. vaccinii and N. rosae were the most abundant. The pathogenicity tests carried out revealed that all tested species werepathogenic to blueberry plants (cultivar Duke). Among the species tested, P. biciliata and N. rosae were the most aggressive ones. Plants inoculated with isolates from these species exhibited more extensive branch necrosis and, in some cases, death of the plant. To our knowledge, this represents the first study and the first report of species of Pestalotiopsis and Neopestalotiopsis in blueberries in Portugal. The diversity and distributionof these species, as well as their pathogenicpotential, need to be further explored in the future.
... Blueberries are functional foods, and their consumption has increased because of their positive effects on people's well-being and health (Romo-Muñoz et al., 2020). In Chile, blueberry production has increased during the last year concentrating 20% of worldwide production (Brazelton and Young, 2017). ...
Article
As blueberries are susceptible to water stress and their future cultivation in semiarid Mediterranean areas will be challenged by drought, irrigation management strategies will be needed to optimize water productivity and maintain sufficient levels of fruit yield and quality. This study aim was to evaluate the effect of different irrigation levels on plant water status, yield, fruit quality, and water productivity in a drip-irrigated rabbiteye blueberry (Vaccinium ashei Reade ’Tifblue’) orchard. Four irrigation treatments based on crop evapotranspiration (ETc) were applied to blueberry plants during two consecutive growing seasons (2012/2013 and 2013/2014): 125 (farmers’ irrigation management, T1), 100 (T2), 75 (T3), and 50 (T4) % ETc. During the study, the average values of midday stem water potential (Ψstem) were 􀀀 0.85, 􀀀 0.86, 􀀀 0.97 and 􀀀 1.11 MPa for the T1, T2, T3, and T4 treatments, respectively. Fruit weight (FW), yield (Y), fruits per plant (FP), soluble solids (SS), and the water stress integral (WSI) were significantly affected by the irrigation treatments. The water productivity (WP), juice pH, and weight/volume ratio were statistically similar among the treatments. The highest values of Y, FP, and FW were observed in the T1 and T2 treatments, while the lowest values were found in the T4 treatment. In addition, the Y, FP, FW and WSI in the T1 and T2 treatments were significantly similar, but the total water application in the T2 treatment was between 20% and 27% lower than that in the T1 treatment. For the T1 and T2 treatments, the values of Y were between 8.8 and 9.4 kg plant 􀀀 1, and the Ψstem was >􀀀 0.85 MPa during the two growing seasons. The interaction between irrigation treatments and growing season was only significant for the FW, with the lowest values observed in the T4 treatment during the 2012/2013 growing season.
... Worldwide blueberry (Vaccinium spp.) production, for both processed and fresh market, has increased over the last decade making blueberry becoming the second most important soft fruit species after strawberry (Romo-Muñoz et al., 2019). Fresh market production, for instance, rose from about 270,000 tons to 370,000 tons in only 4 years (2012-2016, https://www. ...
Article
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Improved fruit quality and prolonged storage capability are key breeding traits for blueberry (Vaccinium spp.) fruit. Until now, breeding selection was mostly oriented on the amelioration of agronomic traits, such as flowering time, chilling requirement, or plant structure. Up until now, however, the storage effect on fruit quality has not been extensively studied, mostly because objective and handy phenotyping tools to evaluate quality traits were not available. In this study we are proposing a novel phenotyping protocol to support breeding selection and quality control within the entire blueberry production chain. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and texture traits, were measured by Proton Transfer Reaction-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS) and a texture analyzer respectively, taking into consideration the influence of prolonged storage. The exploitation of the genetic variability existing within the investigated blueberry germplasm collection (including both southern and northern highbush, hybrids, and rabbiteyes) allowed the identification of the best performing cultivars, based on texture and VOCs variability, to be used as superior parental lines for future breeding programs. The comprehensive characterization of blueberry aroma allowed the identification of a wide array of spectrometric features, mostly related to aldehydes, alcohols, terpenoids, and esters, that can be used as putative biomarkers to rapidly evaluate the blueberry aroma variations related to genetic differences and storability. In addition, this study revealed a lack of straightforward relationship between harvest and postharvest quality features, that might be genotype-dependent.
Article
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Ethylene, produced endogenously by plants and their organs, can induce a wide array of physiological responses even at very low concentrations. Nevertheless, the role of ethylene in regulating blueberry (Vaccinium spp.) ripening and storability is still unclear although an increase in ethylene production has been observed in several studies during blueberry ripening. To overcome this issue, we evaluated the endogenous ethylene production of a Vaccinium germplasm selection at different fruit ripening stages and after cold storage, considering also textural modifications. Ethylene and texture were further assessed also on a bi-parental full-sib population of 124 accessions obtained by the crossing between "Draper" and "Biloxi", two cultivars characterized by a different chilling requirement and storability performances. Our results were compared with an extensive literature research, carried out to collect all accessible information on published works related to Vaccinium ethylene production and sensitivity. Results of this study illustrate a likely role of ethylene in regulating blueberry shelf life. However, a generalisation valid for all Vaccinium species is not attainable because of the high variability in ethylene production between genotypes, which is strictly genotype-specific. These differences in ethylene production are related with blueberry fruit storage performances based on textural alterations. Specifically, blueberry accessions characterized by the highest ethylene production had a more severe texture decay during storage. Our results support the possibility of tailoring ad hoc preharvest and postharvest strategies to extend blueberry shelf life and quality according with the endogenous ethylene production level of each cultivar.
Article
Nowadays, extensive attention has focused on dietary constituents that may be valuable for treating, eating, and preventing diabetes. Numerous studies have shown that anthocyanin’s are one of the most important nutritional factors associated with diabetes. Anthocyanin’s are the leading group of water-soluble pigments in the plant kingdom, and they are generally available in some human diet in fruits, vegetables, cereals, beans. Amongst, bilberries (Vaccinium myrtillus), is one of the essential sources for dietary anthocyanin consumption containing vast amounts of anthocyanin’s, making them the main plant in the treatment and prevention of diabetes. Although the bilberries have other valuable properties such as anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant, the main focus of the present study is to present the effects of bilberries (V. myrtillus) on the prevention and treatment of diabetes.