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FET measurements reveal an n-type semiconductor behaviour when fibre sheaths are used as the channel. (A) Transfer characteristics of a fibre sheath measured at a constant VDS\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$${V}_{DS}$$\end{document}= 0.05 V (20 °C) show a modulation of the drain current ID\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$${I}_{D}$$\end{document} when the gate bias VGS\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$${V}_{GS}$$\end{document} is changed from 0 to 80 V to − 80 V and back to 0 V. The inset shows a fibre sheath to be a flattened ~ 150 nm double stack of fibres contained in a thin sheath. (B) Output characteristics of a fibre sheath under a constant gate voltage varying from − 50 to + 50 V in steps of 20 V show the slope of the current–voltage curve to change as a function of gate bias VGS\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$${V}_{GS}$$\end{document}.

FET measurements reveal an n-type semiconductor behaviour when fibre sheaths are used as the channel. (A) Transfer characteristics of a fibre sheath measured at a constant VDS\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$${V}_{DS}$$\end{document}= 0.05 V (20 °C) show a modulation of the drain current ID\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$${I}_{D}$$\end{document} when the gate bias VGS\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$${V}_{GS}$$\end{document} is changed from 0 to 80 V to − 80 V and back to 0 V. The inset shows a fibre sheath to be a flattened ~ 150 nm double stack of fibres contained in a thin sheath. (B) Output characteristics of a fibre sheath under a constant gate voltage varying from − 50 to + 50 V in steps of 20 V show the slope of the current–voltage curve to change as a function of gate bias VGS\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$${V}_{GS}$$\end{document}.

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Abstract Filamentous cable bacteria exhibit long-range electron transport over centimetre-scale distances, which takes place in a parallel fibre structure with high electrical conductivity. Still, the underlying electron transport mechanism remains undisclosed. Here we determine the intrinsic electrical properties of the conductive fibres in cable...

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... 48 Copyright 2018 Elsevier Ltd. (C) Illustration depicting cable bacteria possessing parallel conductive fibers in their cell envelope. Adapted with permission from Bonnéet al. 49 Copyright 2020 Springer Nature. (D) Scheme highlighting the extracellular electron transport (EET) and long-distance electron transport in cable bacteria. ...
... 50 This air sensitivity, in addition to n-type transport when used as channel material for field effect transistors, is consistent with electrons being the main charge carriers. 49,50 Electrical measurements revealed that electron transport is thermally activated with low activation energy (40−50 meV) and electron mobility of 10 −1 cm 2 V −1 s −1 , comparable with the average mobility of many n-type organic semiconductors. 49,271 The conductivities reported here are much higher than undoped OSC films. ...
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