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Experiment 3: Mean suppression ratios to the target stimulus, X, recorded during testing for each of the three groups. Error bars represent 6 SE.  

Experiment 3: Mean suppression ratios to the target stimulus, X, recorded during testing for each of the three groups. Error bars represent 6 SE.  

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Article
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In a blocking procedure, conditioned stimulus (CS) A is paired with the unconditioned stimulus (US) in Phase 1, and a compound of CSs A and X is then paired with the US in Phase 2. The usual result of such a treatment is that X elicits less conditioned responding than if the A-US pairings of Phase 1 had not occurred. Obtaining blocking with human p...

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Context 1
... is, data from those participants that had less than a +.1 difference between the average suppression ratio to the two last filler trials of Phase 1 ([eighth D-noUS trial + eighth EF-noUS trial] / 2) and the average suppression ratio to the last re- inforced trials of this phase ([eighth A-US (or C-US) trial + eighth B-US trial] / 2) were eliminated from the analysis. The data from 12 participants from Group Control, 5 participants from Group Block- ing, and 6 participants from Group Reversal were excluded from the analyses of Experiment 3. Figure 4 depicts the suppression ratio for the target CS, X, recorded during testing. As can be seen, Experiment 3 replicated the results reported in Experiments 1 (block- ing) and 2 (reversal from blocking). ...
Context 2
... is, there was no significant difference between the conditioned response elicited by CS X after blocking treatment plus posttrain- ing extinction of the blocking stimulus (Group Reversal) and CS X when it had not been subject to blocking treat- ment (Group Control). Indeed, as Figure 4 shows, the mean suppression ratios to the target stimulus at test in both groups were very similar. ...

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