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Example of the vertical ground reaction force recorded during the stance phase of the normal gait cycle.  

Example of the vertical ground reaction force recorded during the stance phase of the normal gait cycle.  

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Walking is the first way of displacement for human and essential for daily life activities and social participation. The human gait can be analyzed from several points of view and specialties. The aim of this chapter is to describe from a simple manner the normal gait in term of gait cycle, acquisition and development of the gait, joint kinematics,...

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... the impact force is followed by a loading response. During this short period, the whole foot is in contact with the ground and the vertical GRF increases to attain the first maximum peak force (F1 on Figure 4). After this first peak, the vertical force diminishes corresponding at the mid stance phase (F2 on the Figure 4). ...
Context 2
... this short period, the whole foot is in contact with the ground and the vertical GRF increases to attain the first maximum peak force (F1 on Figure 4). After this first peak, the vertical force diminishes corresponding at the mid stance phase (F2 on the Figure 4). Indeed during this phase, the opposite foot is in the mid swing phase, therefore the whole body weight is supported by the stance limb. ...
Context 3
... the heel lifts away from the ground, the GRF starts increasing once again. This ascending second peak (F3 on the Figure 4) of the GRF corresponds to the second double support. Finally, the GRF pattern starts descending to zero with the pre-swing phase and drops to zero when the foot leaves the ground (Figure 4). ...
Context 4
... ascending second peak (F3 on the Figure 4) of the GRF corresponds to the second double support. Finally, the GRF pattern starts descending to zero with the pre-swing phase and drops to zero when the foot leaves the ground (Figure 4). ...

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